Emily Bronte And D.H Lawrence's Exploration Of Social Class

1323 words - 5 pages

Social class plays a very significant part in my core text, ‘Wuthering Heights’ and also my partner text , ‘Sons and Lovers’ because it helps the reader determine a sense of character and plays a massive part in the reader finding the true depth of a character. Social class in both novels is determined by location and the origin of the characters, as in ‘Wuthering Heights’ we see that Heathcliff is considered as abnormal and known as having a lower social class because of the uncertainty of his origin. Also in ‘Sons and Lovers’ we see the battle and life between a refined woman of middle class aspirations to a low class hard working miner and their son who discovers a ne conflict of loyalties after many years of taking after his mother. The main female characters in the novels which are Catherine, Cathy and Gertrude have much of the focus of the novels which shows their difficult decisions based on social class, but the other women who are Isabella and Annie are in many ways unessential. The novels reflect how women were viewed in the Victorian era which was inferior to men, thus placing severe limits on women’s aspirations. The main female characters in both novels represent the frustrated, ambitious women who are forced to do and say bad things to climb the social ladder. The stories display their passion which was reviewed negatively in the Victorian era which shows how important social class was to everyone. In Victorian times social class was decided by whom people had married and the location they lived in and people were judged on what they had, this is shown in ‘Wuthering Heights; because Catherine makes a decision on whom to marry based on the men’s social status.

Wuthering Heights is portrayed as a house with low social status because at the start of the novel we are told that it is ‘completely removed from the stir of society.’ This announcement from Lockwood gives us the immediate reaction that Wuthering Heights has a sense of isolation and danger because it is so far away form society and normal life. We feel that the house is unwelcoming because Lockwood who is a typical Victorian gentleman who embodies the classic Victorian values and represents civilization does not fit into Wuthering Heights and feels lonely and out of place. It is very clear to the reader that he is an outsider and none of his social opinions apply to the house. ‘Sons and Lovers’ opens with a description of the mines and the village that The Morel’s live in. The opening is similar to ‘Wuthering Heights’ because they both open with a place that is full of un-happiness and misery because Wuthering Heights embodies Heathcliff and his revenge and The Morels’ home embodies poverty. The opening of ‘Sons and Lovers’ shows how Mrs Morel who is a refined woman of middle class aspirations is un-happy because she married a low class hard working miner and is forced to move to the Bottoms, a place Mrs Morel would not choose to live.
‘Mrs Morel was not anxious to...

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