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England's Religion Essay

674 words - 3 pages

In 1492-1700 England gained a lot of land and power during the time of the age of empires and what help them do this was religion. so we will look at how Thomas more, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I of England the Colonies, the puritans , Roman Catholics, Lutheran,etc. England was a major part of the world in the age of empires, and one factor that played a role in helping was England's religion.
The people who influenced and left a mark on the religions that help england expand are Thomas more, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I of England. Sir Thomas More known to Roman Catholics as Saint Thomas More was born February 7, 1478 and Died July 6 1535. He opposed the Protestant Reformation, Sir Thomas More also opposed the King's separation from the Catholic Church and did not accept him as Head of the English church, At one point in time he seriously Thought abandoning his legal career to become a monk. he was tried for treason because he would ...view middle of the document...


The colonies left a big mark on religion One of the main reasons for creating the colonies was religious freedom .The colonies were mostly made up of puritans and roman catholics.The reasons why these were the main religions to try and start colonies was because they face a lot of persecution now that new and easier religions have arose.both religions were strict and tough. The puritans trying to convert native americans sought a peaceful relationship and in the end war broke out among them. even tho they try to escape and expand it was not very successful. But as time went on religion became more diverse in the colonies Congregationalist, Lutheran, Dutch Reformed, Anglican, Moravian, Roman Catholics,Mennonite, Brethern, Amish, Schwenkfelder, Huguenots, all formed in the colonies later on in time
The religions in england can be easy and hard this will show us what they were like. Roman Catholicism remained the dominant form of Christianity, until the Anglican Church became the independent established church in England.anglican Church separated from the Roman Catholic Church in 1534 and became the established church by an Act of Parliament in the Act of Supremacy.Roman catholic word force you to go unless sick and if you did not they would punish you .The pope lost most of his power at this time. The reformations made way for the Anglican church to emerge.
under the control of Queen Mary I and King Philip, the church was fully restored under Rome in 1555. The term puritan in reality was a term of ridicule made by the rival religions
Puritans did not believe in free will, they believed in predestination and good will.
Puritans were prosecuted because their religion had high and hard social standard and different interpretations of the bible so conflict arose, and new religion that were more simple came so people left .The puritans fined, whipped, banish and hung people to get them to come to their church. in 1631 roger williams a puritans preach about the separation of church and state..

This is how englands religion it played its role. As we have just learned about how England was a major part of the world in the age of empires, and the factor that played a role in helping religion.

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