English Media Literacy Essay

2274 words - 9 pages

[Type text] [Type text] [Type text]Running Head: CREDIBILITY OF JOURNALISM Mathew 1Credibility of Journalism of EbolaRhea MathewDr. KeatonEnglish Rhetoric and CompositionMarquette University28 October, 2014Credibility of Journalism of EbolaImagine yourself sitting in a bus filled with people on the way home from a much-needed vacation. You feel excited to finally be home and are looking forward to reverting to your normal routine. Suddenly, the bus stops, and a woman quickly exits to vomit. You are now informed that your bus will be held in quarantine for an undetermined amount of time because the lady may have Ebola. You get a sinking feeling in your stomach as you slowly realize that all of your plans are foiled and/or must be postponed, and you also may have contracted a deadly virus. Three weeks later, after being held in a quarantine center, you receive the news that it was a false alarm and the lady never had Ebola after all. Twenty-one days of your life have been utterly wasted.Ebola is a global health issue that has affected several different countries around the world. Many experts and world leaders have taken several different approaches in dealing with this internationally notorious phenomenon. This paper will discuss the topic of Ebola from the perspective that views the illness in a lighter way, attempting to reduce its gravitational prominence in today's society. It will discuss this topic's coverage in four different sources: Aljazeera, CNN, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and CNS News. It was found that the article from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution is less credible than the other three evaluated sources because it did not meet two criteria points. I used three criteria in evaluating the four sources I used to study this cause: how well the author creates a reasonable, logically structured argument, appealing to logos; how well the author persuades the readers that he/she is knowledgeable, reliable, credible, and trustworthy appealing to ethos; and how well the writer appeals to readers' emotions, sympathies, and values, appealing to pathos. The articles were evaluated using these three criteria because I believe appealing to logos, ethos, and pathos are the key components on rhetoric, and a journalist would not be considered credible if he/she could not meet those points. It is important that these articles should be evaluated this way for the American news consumer because a lack of credibility can lead to false information spreading from person to person, ultimately leaving Americans with inaccurate perspectives on the subject matter. This is why the American news consumer should typically hold journalists to a certain standard before deciding whether or not they should believe the content.The first source I evaluated was from Al Jazeera, an international news website. It discusses the potential end to Ebola in Nigeria. "The World Health Organization called Nigeria a 'spectacular success story' Monday after it declared the...

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