Equity Within The Women's Rights Movement

1546 words - 7 pages

The Civil Rights Movement was initiated during the 1953 to 1955 period during which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Brown versus The Board of Education, ending legalized racial segregation. This organized civil movement represented inequities in both political and economic power against people of the African-American race and followed boycotts and other organized civil actions in Alabama and Louisiana. Representing the inequities and civil inequities and injustices of generations, slavery, the development of the NAACP, and the Fair Employment Practices Committee, the civil rights movement was a resurgence of societal conditions and public awareness that supported this organized civil action.
The historic subrogation of African-Americans in the South and the perception of black equitability supported by the constitutional inequalities of black men made organizing country- wide civil movement impossibility. World War 1 American conditions of power and economic conditions, particularly in the agrarian communities of the South necessitated changing from a dominance of farming to a dominance of industry. This change fostered the immigration of necessary Black workers to the North. As mechanization became more mechanized, both Blacks and Whites became economically displaced and disadvantaged. The resources needed to support World War 2 highlighted the contributions and the economy of the South.
The transition of Blacks to cities enabled the formation of civic, voting, and political entities, and the establishment of a Black middle class. The advent of African-American colleges, civil and leisure fraternizations, and churches enabled economic resources to Black families as well as a communications network by which Blacks could communicate and organize. African-American non-violent protests were received well by the North and supported economically while violent protest were seen as negative and riotous actions and were condemned by Whites. The weakening of the economic, social, and political structure of the South resulted in the isolation of the South from the rest of the nation. While the economic change in the South created an environment of a perceived need for racial equality, the realization of Black inferiority was unchanged. This led to unrest in the South over Black rights and integration of racially segregated environments.
While the unification of the Black middle class provided an environment of racial consciousness, the US government continued to enforce segregation, fight desegregation, and legally resist the political protests of Black activism (including, Rosa Parks, the resulting bus boycotts, and organized, non-violent protests. This disingenuous relationship between civil rights activism and the United States government initiated the selection of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as the voice of non-violence civil and racial unity. Dr. King organized a paradigm shift in the way protests and boycotts...

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