Essay On The Development Of The Theme Of Loyalty In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) Through The Actions Of A Young Boy's Abandoning Class Lines In The Racist Antebellum Years.

915 words - 4 pages

Loyalty is a state of devoted attachment to someone or something. Loyalty is perhaps one of the most admirable qualities one can have; it is not only a measure of one's true character, but one's decisions as well. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there is no greater loyalty than that which exists between young Huck Finn and Jim. Jim demonstrates his loyalty to Huck by remaining with Huck as almost a paternal figure once he misses his turn on the river for Cairo, thereby continuing deeper into the hazardous South. Huck, in turn, demonstrates his loyalty to Jim by returning for Jim once Jim is taken captive. By doing so, Huck also demonstrates his loyalty to humanity through his betrayal of racism. In Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain develops the theme that loyalty is measured through one's actions in times of crisis by having Huckleberry break class lines and befriend a runaway slave in the racist antebellum years. Jim's loyalty to Huck is best demonstrated through Jim's decisions on the river. Jim, who is a runaway slave, heading to Cairo in search of work and his family, is heading downriver with Huck and misses his turn for Cairo. Jim's decision to remain with Huck costs him a chance to find work and a chance to find his family, whom he dearly misses. Their mistake in navigation also leads the duo farther South into slave territory, bringing potentially hazardous situations for a runaway slave. Jim's loyalty is reinforced later on in their adventures, as Jim passes his greatest opportunity for freedom in order to find medical attention for the wounded Tom Sawyer. Jim's loyalty to the two young boys simultaneously contradicts racial stereotypes while affirming the consequences may accompany decisions of loyalty. Huck's loyalty to Jim, although perhaps out of reciprocity, is demonstrated best through Huck's decision to withhold Jim's location from the Widow Douglas and his efforts to free Jim from the Phelps family. Huck's ability to recognize that Jim is a decent person, not just a slave, allows Huck to overcome his immoral roots and his supposed Christian obligations to return Jim to the Widow Douglas. Huck's development as a character allows Huck to recognize some of society's immoral institutions, among of which is slavery. When Jim is sold to a local farmer by the Duke and the King, Huck decides to attempt to free him, rather than leave him to be returned to the Widow Douglas. Although Huck begins a slight regression during his attempted escapes, Huck is able to work with Tom Sawyer to free his friend...

Find Another Essay On Essay on the development of the theme of loyalty in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) through the actions of a young boy's abandoning class-lines in the racist antebellum years.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain transports the

1375 words - 6 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain transports the reader back in time giving a unique perspective of the world. Huck Finn is a wild, uneducated adolescent who by chance came into a large sum of money. Huck is constantly searching for a place where he feels free. He's not looking for trouble, but somehow trouble always finds him. Throughout the story, Huck is haunted by the ever present bad influence of his friend, Tom Sawyer. Huck

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain.

1340 words - 5 pages "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" was published in 1876 and in the same year, Mark Twain began its sequel, "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", which he called "another boy's book." He and William Dean Howells, the editor of Atlantic Monthly, had a debate about Tom Sawyer that centered around the idea of having Tom "drift into manhood." Twain later gave up the idea of carrying Tom beyond boyhood; instead, he chose to develop the character of

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1919 words - 8 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain draws on his past experiences towards the institution of slavery in order to depict his characters in a way that glorifies anti-slavery characters and vilifies pro-slavery characters in an attempt to denounce the institution of slavery. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, known more commonly by his pen name Mark Twain, was born in 1835, during the antebellum period in the United States. In the period before

"The adventures of huckleberry finn" by Mark Twain.

531 words - 2 pages Mark Twain wrote the novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It spans approximately 240 pages and was chosen because it is part of the eleventh grade curriculum.The book begins and takes place in St. Petersburg, Missouri, along the Mississippi River; the setting later changes depending on how far down the river they go. The time frame is the early to mid-nineteenth century. The main character, for which the book is named, is Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1463 words - 6 pages slaves –, adolescent readers unfortunately don’t always get the real message of this book and that’s why the novel is often controversial. (Churchwell, par. 18) After reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Mark Twain’s Autobiography as well, I have a feeling that somewhere deep inside Huckleberry Finn is actually the young Mark Twain. The writer wrote about his own early life experiences and a little bit of himself through the characters and

Mark Twain and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

2834 words - 11 pages Mark Twain and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn      Samuel Clemens was an American writer and humorist who's best work is shown by broad social satire, realism of place and language, and memorable characters.        Clemens was born November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri. His family moved to Hannibal, Mississippi when he was four. There he received a public school education. Samuel Clemens was a difficult child

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.

1512 words - 6 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel that really began in Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. In Tom Sawyer readers are introduced to Huck Finn. In this novel he is seen a terrible child and the other children are encouraged to stay away from him because he is poor and his father is a drunk. This, however, didn’t stop Tom Sawyer and him and Huck still went on many adventures together. One of these adventures ended in both of them getting six

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1968 words - 8 pages throughout The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, he undergoes a loss of innocence as he experiences society’s prejudices through the eyes of Jim the slave. Jim is Huck’s companion throughout his adventure down the river, but Jim is also a slave who works under Miss Watson and a man who is strongly affected by superstition. During Jim and Huck’s first encounter, Huck first impression was that he is superstitious idiot. In parallel with Huck’s

Overview: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

2623 words - 10 pages , and our literature. Indeed, it is evident that Mark Twain, the author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, attempted to create a parallel to the biblical story of Moses. Huckleberry Finn exhibits strong parallels to the story of Moses; these parallels include the important role that the rivers played in the start of the protagonists’ respective origins and escape from their respective father-figures, their being plucked from the river and

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain - 1253 words

1253 words - 5 pages because Huck can see this injustice in his rural community and in the country at large. Mark Twain, the author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, once said that “Just because you’re taught that something’s right and everyone believes it’s right, it don’t make it right.” People were given minds and the ability to form their own thoughts and opinions. During the mid -1800’s, it didn’t appear that many people were

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain

1626 words - 7 pages Imagine taking a great and adventurous trip along the Mississippi just a few years after the great Civil War. Well, that is a voyage that young Huck Finn took in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer written by Mark Twain. In this book, many aspects of Huck and his civilization or lack-there-of are brought up for discussion. As the reader progresses through the story, he or she will soon discover that it is not Huck whose civilization should be up for

Similar Essays

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

4472 words - 18 pages reading list. However, if the story is closely examined, it takes on darker undertones of a racist culture replete with derogatory language and glimpses into the ugliness and turmoil that followed in the years immediately after the Civil War, and that still exist today. Controversial and racist are two words commonly used to describe Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It is considered to be the quintessential American novel, yet it

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1176 words - 5 pages own faith and make their own decisions. The most important part of free will is that people are able to construct their own opinions on what they believe. The book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, most commonly known as Huck Finn, has had many speculations and controversies over it, and a lot of strong opinions about it have been made regarding it. An editorial from 1982, from the Washington Post states its own views about the book: The

Symbolism In “The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn” By Mark Twain

808 words - 3 pages Rivers flow freely and calmly, and people usually go to the river to get away from the hectic world around them. With nature surrounding them, people can find peace and quietness. The Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States. It’s length and width, along with its fast flowing current, makes it an ideal scene to escape civilization. In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, the two main characters, Huck and Jim

Mark Twain Describe The River As A Symbol In "The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn"

1244 words - 5 pages In the story of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain uses many different types of symbols to get Twains numerous messages across. Twain signifies the Mississippi river as a symbol to get away from society for Huck and Jim. Twain also criticizes the way society runs and the things it teaches everyone to be. The river vs. land setting in Huckleberry Finn symbolizes Huck's struggle with himself versus society; Twain suggests that a person shouldn't have to