Essay On 'the Great Gatsby' (Fitzergerald): The Question Of Nick Carraway's Integrity

534 words - 2 pages

In pursuing relationships, we come to know people only step by step.Unfortunately, as our knowledge of others' deepens, we often move from enchantment todisenchantment. Initially we overlook flaws or wish them away; only later do we realizeperil of this course. In the novel 'The Great Gatsby' by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the journeyfrom delight to disappointment may be seen in the narrator, Nick Carraway. Moving frominitial interest to romantic allure to moral repugnance, Nick's relationship with JordanBaker traces a painfully familiar, all-to-human arc.Nick's initial interest in Jordan is mainly for her looks and charm. Upon first sightof her at the Buchanan's mansion, he is at once drawn to her appearance. He Notes herbody 'extended full length' on the divan, her fluttering lips, and her quaintly tipped chin.He observes the lamp light that 'glinted along the paper as she turned a page with aflutter of slender muscles in her arms.' He is willing to overlook her gossipy chatterabout Tom's extra-marital affair, and is instead beguiled by her dry witticisms and herapparent simple sunniness: 'Time for this good girl to go to bed,' she says. When Daisybegins her matchmaking of Nick and Jordan, we sense that she is only leading whereNick's interest is already taking him.It is Jordan, then, who makes Nick feel comfortable at Gatsby's party, as we sensewhat Nick senses: they're becoming a romantic couple. As they drive home a summerhouse-party, Nick notes her dishonesty but forgives it, attributing it to her understandableneed to get by in a man's world. She praises his lack of carelessness, tells him directly 'Ilike...

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