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Ethos, Pathos, Logos Essay

696 words - 3 pages

Same-Sex Adoption
Rhetoric is the art of persuasion, through which the rhetor, the party doing the persuading, uses to appeal to their target or the audience. Rhetorical appeals are the strategies one uses to support a claim or argument, in order to persuade someone to agree with what is being argued and in turn they can be used when responding to any opposing views. In any piece of good writing, all 3 appeals are present. In “Lesbian and Gay Adoption,” Annette R. Appell is discussing the different ways homosexuals have chosen to go about having children, with adoption being the main subject. She is an Associate Professor at the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada. She uses her background in law to provide the reader with the legal obstacles homosexuals have had to overcome and those they cannot seem to get over when it comes to adopting which is a major way she establishes her credibility or ethos. She is sure to incorporate pathos and logos in her piece as well. All of the forms of rhetoric are present in this article and they have effectively been put to use.
Pathos appeals to one’s softer side. A prime example of pathos are the adopt a pet commercials on TV. The advertisers show a helpless animal, get some actor with a soft, compassionate voice to tell their story, and cap it off with the saddest song in the history of music playing in the background. Appell uses this appeal in her article just not to that extent. In the introduction, she appeals to the emotion of the reader because it does not seem fair that someone’s sexuality dictates whether or not they can adopt. “Although homosexuals adopt for the same reason as heterosexuals do, “…to fulfill a desire to be a parent; to provide a home for a child; and to protect a non-legally sanctioned parent-child relationship,” (Appell 76) homosexuals have a harder time than their heterosexual equals. Starting her article off with an emotional approach makes it easier for her delve in with all...

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