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Evaluating The Anti Stress Effects Of Resveratrol

736 words - 3 pages

Stress leads to threatened body homeostasis which causes biochemical and physiological changes that result in serious health risks. The aim of present study was to evaluate anti-stress effects of resveratrol, a polyphenol compound in an animal model of chronic restraint stress (CS). The effect of resveratrol was studied on CS-induced perturbations in behavioral, biochemical and brain oxidative stress status. The rats were subjected to restrain stress in an adjustable cylindrical plastic tube for 3 h once daily for ten consecutive days. Resveratrol (20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (1 mg/kg) were administered 60 min prior to the stress procedure for 10 days. Behavioral parameters (ambulations and rearing); biochemical parameters like serum glucose, creatinine, corticosterone levels and total leucocyte count were measured. On day 10, the rats were sacrificed and biochemical assessment of superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GSH) in whole rat brain were performed. Exposure to chronic restraint stress produced significant reduction of ambulations and rearings in open field test. Pretreatment with resveratrol normalized the behavioral parameters. Chronic restraint stress produced elevation in serum glucose (136 ± 0.2 mg/dl), creatinine (3.34 ± 0.01 mg/dl), corticosterone (17.2 ± 0.09 µg/dl) levels and total leucocytes (8033 ± 10.4 cells/mm3). Administration of resveratrol significantly reversed these changes. Restraint stress also causes significant reduction in CAT, SOD, GSH levels and increased lipid peroxidation in rat brain. Resveratrol significantly restored brain oxidative stress indices. This proved that resveratrol reversed oxidative damage to brain and possesses promising anti-stress activity.

Key words: Catalase, chronic restraint stress, HPA axis, lipid peroxidation, restraint stress, resveratrol.
INTRODUCTION
Stress can be defined as physical and psychological modifications that disrupt the homeostasis and the balance of organisms [1]. Restrain stress is an easy and convenient method to induce both psychological (escape reaction) and physical stress (muscle work) resulting in restricted mobility and aggression. Restraint is a preferred means of stressing animals, largely because it is straightforward and painless method [2]. Immobilization has been used extensively as a stressor for the study of stress-related biological, biochemical and physiological responses in animals [3]. It has been postulated that...

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