Everyday Life In Sixteenth Century France

1061 words - 4 pages

The lifestyle in France, just like in all other European countries, has changed dramatically since the early 1700’s. People went from farmers to factory owners to all of the professions of today’s society. The main reason for the great changes in lifestyle that occurred in France was the Industrial Revolution, which urbanized most of France. But the Industrial Revolution was not the only thing that changed France. The monarchy fell the church changed, and the role people had in their jobs and family life change drastically.

In the sixteenth century France was mainly a farming country. People lived in small communities and rarely died in a town other than where they were born (Gildea 42). Family life was quit simple, men married when they inherited land from their fathers or if a women’s family had land to give him. Women were around the ages of twenty-six to twenty seven when they married, men where a bit older. Family’s usually lived all together, grandparents, cousin; all under one roof. A woman had about six kids and it was understood that about half of the children would die in the first three years of life (Davis 65). Life was not sanitary and there was really no type of real medicines. A typical day consisted of getting up when the sun rose and going to work in the fields and everyone helped. Women and their children worked just as long as all the men did. When the sun went down it was time to go back to the house and eat a meal of bread, beer, and sometimes vegetables. Meat was eaten on very rare occasions, maybe only twice a year. Bedtime was soon after the sun went down. This was the routine everyday. All of the villages had a church, which kept precise records of all births and deaths. Most of the churches were Catholic and did little to educate the children in the small farming communities (Gildea 416). Education was not really needed when life was only about farming.

During this time in France the church was very powerful politically and economically, the church did not really want to educate many people, especially poor people (Gildea 225). Life for nobles and clergy were very different from the farmers in the 1700’s. Nobles did not have to work. They basically had nice things and lived in big houses and ate a lot of good food. Noble's daily meals consisted of a variety of meats, and sides of cheese and wine (Gildea 119). Bread and anything grown in the ground was considered peasant food and was not eaten by the nobles at all. This is the way life had been and it slowly began to change in the 1700’s.

The scientific revolution and the enlightenment began to alter the everyday life of people in France. Navigation became a huge part of many people’s lives. Men began to study the sky’s more to figure out where they were on the sea’s (Turner 482). The study of the sky led some to make hypotheses about the universe. During this time there was a rebirth of the quest for knowledge. Universities grew during this time; it became more...

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