This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

How George Orwell Uses Tone And Diction In 1984

616 words - 2 pages

George Orwell uses tone and diction in his book to mold the scene of 1984 into a gloomy, dark and depressing set. He begins with setting the time of day, thirteen. Choosing "thirteen" instead of one Orwell sets a tone of an over militarized nation. He then moves on to using "boiled cabbage and old rag mats"; an all-enveloping, oppressive smell one couldn't wish on even on their worst enemy. The combination of these two along with the babbling telescreen, snooping police, and contrived posters anchor the despotic tone. Orwell didn't always use negative tones; he sometimes employed positive diction to throw the reader off balance or to show significance. When describing Winston's diary he uses the words "beautiful, creamy paper." This is the second instance Orwell uses positive diction. It brings out the importance of the book in the oppressive world of Oceania where even thinking about writing down thoughts would be an extreme crime. Orwell describes Winston's writing as small clumsy letters. This diction was more effective back when Orwell had first written this book because the people back then would've thought that by 1984 everyone should be able to read and handwrite.The first time Orwell uses positive diction is when he is describing the Ministry of Truth. He calls it "…an enormous pyramidal structure of glittering white concrete, soaring up, terrace after terrace, three hundred meters into the air." It sounds majestic, it sounds wonderful, and it sounds wrong. Just seconds before that he was describing the city as, "sordid colonies" and "chicken houses." This is showing the reader that the government doesn't care about their people enough to fix the city, but they care enough to keep the white concrete beaming....

Find Another Essay On How George Orwell uses Tone and Diction in 1984

1984 by George Orwell Essay

808 words - 4 pages . Psychological manipulation in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, is used as one of the party’ main control tactics. The party uses different forms of psychological manipulation within the society such as, the influence of telescreens to instill fear in citizens and create a lack of privacy within the society. Secondly, the party uses psychological manipulation in the children by inducing them into groups that are pro Big Brother at a young age. And also, the

1984, by George Orwell Essay

1070 words - 4 pages It is feasible that in the future machines may be more powerful than man, to such an extent that machines control mankind, mechanizing human life. This is seen in Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano, a post-World War III society in which machines are more powerful than mankind (Ponniah 229).The Technology in 1984, by George Orwell, has a similar influence. 1984 portrays a totalitarian society, powered by the icon of Big Brother. Big Brother and his

"1984" by George Orwell

3723 words - 15 pages Author:The book Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell was written in 1948 and published in 1949. It is one of Orwell´s most famous books.Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in

1984 By George Orwell

1955 words - 8 pages Winston Smith realizes after all the pain and torture; he loves Big Brother. What major geographical topics are discussed? One of the major geographical topics discussed in the book is the concept of Nationalism. According to George Orwell nationalism is the habit of

1984, by George Orwell

1829 words - 7 pages George Orwell's dystopian (a fictional place where people lead dehumanized and fearful lives) vision of the year 1984, as depicted in what many consider to be his greatest novel, has entered the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world more completely than perhaps any other political text, whether fiction or nonfiction. No matter how far our contemporary world may seem from 1984's Oceania, any suggestion of government surveillance

Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell

863 words - 3 pages Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell Symbols are everywhere. Whether it’s the cross of Christianity, or the swastika of the Third Reich, symbols can convey messages of love, or hate, without ever having to say a word. While George Orwell in his masterpiece 1984 does, of course, use words to convey his themes, he also uses symbols. In the novel 1984, symbols are used as a way for Orwell to reinforce his three major themes. One such

Sybolism in "1984" by George Orwell

1062 words - 4 pages . In conclusion, these symbols intensify deep insight into the theme and the characters of the novel. Orwell uses Winston to create a hatred for the society. In fact he has so well used the symbolism that the reader is compelled to empathize with all of his thoughts and feelings about the party. Orwell warns about the dangers of totalitarianism through objects, places and characters to prove his point. He through Winston's eyes and thoughts gives the reader an idea of the new society, which has no place for freedom, truth or human emotions. Bibliography: George Orwell: 1984. New York, Penguin Books, 1949.

"1984" by George Orwell

1337 words - 5 pages METHODS OF CONTROL===========================================================In the novel Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell there is a system of controlling by manipulating the populations thoughts. History in the novel is distorted or completely altered by the upper Party who control the proletarians and lower Party. The states in Nineteen Eighty-four are led by a high powered minority group who keeps a heavy eye on the rest of the

Orwell, George. "1984"

586 words - 2 pages 1984, George Orwell's dystopian fiction novel based on his objections to government and to warn of future Communism, was created in the same year as the Soviet Union detonated its first atomic bomb. The presentation of the horrors that may derive from giving power to the government shocked many readers and made them aware of the dangers of controlled life."WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH," depicts an important example of

George orwell, "1984"

1478 words - 6 pages In George Orwell's "1984", Winston Smith and Julia live in Oceania, where their actions become a subversive force that the "Party" must control. Oceania, located in Europe, represents a totalitarian society in its purest form during the 1940s. Many aspects of Wilson's and Julia's daily life in Oceania are monitored and controlled by the "Party." From the telescreen to the thought police, every action is under constant surveillance. In order to

"1984"- George Orwell

315 words - 2 pages Winston Smith is a disillusioned Outer Party member in Oceania, in the year 1984, and he begins to question the validity of the Party and its doctrines, like no sex for joy (only for procreation) and the ever-present telescreen which monitors his apartment all day. He feels the Party is restrictive and overpowering free thought and will (what Winston feels are fundamental to being human), but he is fearful of the Thought Police who patrol

Similar Essays

Government Control And Privacy Issues In 1984 By George Orwell

1709 words - 7 pages government can use this information against us if necessary. In 1984 it is shown that O’Brien knew what Winston wrote in his diary even though Winston thought he had it hidden quite well and not only did he know but he also used what Winston wrote against him, “Do you remember writing in your diary, ‘I understand HOW: I do not understand WHY’?...” (Orwell, 329.) How would O’Brien know what Winston wrote? The only way O’Brien would know what Winston

Power And Corruption In George Orwell´S 1984

838 words - 4 pages Nineteen Eighty-Four was written in the past yet seems to show very interesting parallels to some of today’s societies. Orwell explains many issues prominent throughout the book in which his main characters attempt to overcome. He shows how surveillance can easily corrupt those in control and how those in control become corrupt by the amount of power. Those with power control the society and overpower all those below. The novel shows what

1984 George Orwell Analytical Essay

966 words - 4 pages Robert Sanchez 992542 P.5 Finesse of Emotions What makes us human? What makes us human is our curiosity and constant evolution. What makes us human is the ability to create social categories and to form opinions. Abstract emotions including love, thought and creativity are what make us human. In 1984, George Orwell uses his dystopia to show that if we were to abolish these abstract emotions we would cease to be human and become

1984 By George Orwell Essay

1197 words - 5 pages George Orwell, whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair, was born on June 25, 1903 in Motihari India to Richard and Ida Blair. Orwell and his mother moved back to England so Orwell could grow up according to the Anglo-Indian custom. In his lifetime, Orwell attended several schools, but decided not to continue his education in 1921. Therefore, Orwell went to work for the Indian Imperial Police Force. Orwell worked there for five years, but finally