What Aldous Huxley's 'brave New World' And Anthony Burgess' 'a Clockwork Orange' Say About The Possibility Of A Utopia, And How They Utilise Conventions Of The Utopian Genre.

938 words - 4 pages

Without loneliness, how could we appreciate love? Without war, how could we appreciate peace? Binary opposition underlies the essence of our world. It is because of this that the term “Utopia”, usually meaning a place of utmost perfection, is also used to mean an unrealistic ideal that is impossible to achieve. This has, in turn, spawned the concept of dystopia – a negative utopia, being a totalitarian and repressive world where the state holds all power over nearly every aspect of public and private life.A recurring theme in the Utopian genre is the resulting creation of a dystopia in an effort to reach Utopia. Two novels which clearly illustrate this convention are Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ and Anthony Burgess’ ‘A Clockwork Orange’, later adapted by Stanley Kubrick as a film. Other conventions of the Utopian genre include lack of depth of characterization, and the text’s ability to analyse the state of the society in which it was written and to provide an array of possibilities for the future.‘Brave New World’ presents a satiric dystopia as humanity lives in a carefree, healthy, and technologically advanced society. However, all forms of human expression have been sacrificed as, Mustapha Mond states, “You’ve got to choose between happiness and what people used to call high art. We’ve sacrificed the high art.” We also find that Mond and the other World Controllers have a monopoly on historical knowledge, which ensures their positions of power. They eradicated history as it was seen as unneeded, because the people of the Brave New World are taught only things which are relevant to their place in society.Set in a dystopian near future, ‘A Clockwork Orange’ shows Alex, a 15-year-old boy who roams the streets at night with his gang members, committing violent crimes for fun. “A Clockwork Orange” follows the utopian convention of the state attempting to create a utopia by controlling the individual, as Alex is used as an example of the state’s power to "rehabilitate" criminals by conditioning them to associate violent acts with a sensation of severe physical illness. Through this, the government eliminates the very thing that constitutes Alex’s humanity; as the novel says, “A man who cannot choose ceases to be a man.” Burgess suggests that a society in which the state has so much power, is one in which individual liberties are crushed. In the film adaptation, the song Alex whistles on his way home from his evening of violence is actually a modern adaptation of the Funeral March of Queen Mary II written by Henry Purcell in 1694. It is as though Alex is whistling an eulogy to the end of the world.As can be seen, it is impossible to create a Utopia without suppressing individual liberties for the greater good of the state, which would create a most...

Find Another Essay On What Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' and Anthony Burgess' 'A Clockwork Orange' say about the possibility of a Utopia, and how they utilise conventions of the Utopian genre.

Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange Essay

1482 words - 6 pages not as important as the act of someone choosing to be good. This element of choice, no matter what the outcome, displays man’s power as an individual. “A Clockwork Orange” starts with Alex posing the question: “what’s it going to be then, eh?”. Burgess begins the story by demonstrating that Alex and his gang are free to do as they choose. Alex and his “droogs” are rebellious modern youth in an oppressive society. The “droogs” are tempted like

Music, Violence, and Identity in Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange

1481 words - 6 pages , invoked in connection with Alex’s departure from violence, announces the return of individual identity. In helping to clarify the role that violence plays in the destruction of individual identity, musical references in Burgess’ work reveal the annihilation of self as the ultimate end of violence. Works Cited 1. Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1986). 2. Ludwig Van Beethoven, "Libretto," Symphony #9, Arturo Toscanini dir., Louis Untermeyer trans., NBC Symphony Orchestra, BGM 1990.

A Clockwork Orange a critical anylsis of the critically acclaimed novel by anthony burgess

2146 words - 9 pages move up and on in the world.Anthony Burgess was born John Anthony Burgess Wilson on February 25, 1917 in Manchester, England. He spoke eight languages, not including English. Burgess was a composer of music since the age of sixteen years. He taught himself how to read music and how to play the piano. The inspiration for A Clockwork Orange came while during World War II, when his wife was assaulted while he fought. She died about a month after the

Freedom of Choice in Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange

992 words - 4 pages “Goodness is something chosen. When a man cannot choose he ceases to be a man.” In the novel, A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, the protagonist, Alex is faced with many opportunities to make choices. Although the majority of Alex’s choices are bad, they are still choices. Alex’s freedom of choice is ripped from him when he becomes the subject of an experiment that forces him to make good choices, however, he is still the same bad

Abuse of Power in" A Clockwork Orange" by Anthony Burgess

1325 words - 5 pages The choice between good and evil is a decision every man must make throughout his life in order to guide his actions and control his future. This element of choice, no matter what the outcome, displays man's power as an individual. Any efforts to control or influence this choice between good and evil will in turn govern man's free will and enslave him. In the novel A Clockwork Orange, the author uses symbolism through imagery, the

Power of Choice in Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange

1405 words - 6 pages       The choice between good and evil is a decision every man must make throughout his life in order to guide his actions and control his future. This element of choice, no matter what the outcome, displays man's power as an individual.  Any efforts to control or influence this choice between good and evil will in turn govern man's free will and enslave him.  In the novel A Clockwork

Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

890 words - 4 pages love and desire by making a plethora of vices available to the community. It does not matter how the community becomes happy only that they are happy in the end. It appears that the Controller has met his utilitarian on the surface but upon further investigation it can be found that utilitarianism is not fully supported in Huxley's essay. Jeremy Bentham believed that humanity is ruled by two masters, pleasure and pain. In the Utopian society the

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

1323 words - 5 pages prevents the novel from becoming dated” (15), gives each reader a different experience and have immense possibilities on how to view Alex as a character. The question of human morality has been discussed and argued for many years, and Anthony Burgess challenges the question of free will in A Clockwork Orange. First, what exactly is human morality? In a the journal of Strong Reciprocity and the Roots of Human Morality, clearly articulates the roots

A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange, written by Anthony Burgess,

798 words - 3 pages A Clockwork OrangeA Clockwork Orange, written by Anthony Burgess, is a book designed to instigate much further thought and analization than what is needed by just reading the book itself. It?s controversial topics stick with the reader throughout his or her whole day. There are three main things that made this book more thought provoking than most others: the ?slang? used, the detail given about the many different events that took place, and the

"A clockwork Orange" by Anthony burgess

1461 words - 6 pages A clockwork Orange by Anthony burgess is one of the most interesting, and suspended book that I have come across in a long time. Alex, the main character is only 15 years old. That is what made his role so shocking, because of the actions he commits, such as raping and murdering, especially for a teen that young. The book genre could be categorized as horror, drama, and Sci-Fi.It never states in the book when this story takes place, but I think

Stability, Silence, and Progression: Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

1392 words - 6 pages to the reader, “So be excited about the future. Trust us—we’ve already seen it” (Our State). Appealing to college-bound students, ECU claims they have seen the future because the students are the possibilities. The students, along with the graduation hats and diplomas, simultaneously serve as a symbol for progress, therefore encouraging advancement and honoring the future, unlike the Brave New World society. As demonstrated in the image

Similar Essays

Dystopian Society Explored In A Clockwork Orange, By Anthony Burgess And Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

1672 words - 7 pages Deprived Identity A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley are both novels that deal with the theme of dystopia. Both novels depict societies in which mind control is used to create social stability. There are also individuals who rebel against this loss of freedom and identity. However, these individuals lose their fight for freedom because of unsuccessful escape methods, acts of violence and effective

Anthony Burgess And A Clockwork Orange

1214 words - 5 pages Imagine existing in a world run by sadistic and insane street gangs who reek havoc on innocent civilians, and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it. Anthony Burgess created this world through his novel, A Clockwork Orange. Anthony Burgess was born in 1917 and died in 1963. A lot of social changes occurred during this period of time, such as: the roaring twenties, prohibition, the Great Depression, World War II, the fall of the Berlin

About The Novel, A Clockwork Orange, By Anthony Burgess

1687 words - 7 pages A Clockwork OrangeThere have been many books published solely on philosophy, and many more than that solely written about human nature, but very infrequently will a book be published that weaves these fields together as well as A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess. In this Book Burgess speculated on the fact "the significance of maturing by choice is to gain moral values and freedoms." He achieved this task by pushing his angsty teenaged

The Literary Merit Of Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange And Exploring Reasons Why It Was Banned

963 words - 4 pages There are many books that have been banned or challenged, but the one that is being presented in this paper is Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange. The topic of this paper is to inform you of many things and when you have finished it will have you leaving asking yourself one question. First, a summary of A Clockwork Orange will be shared with you, so that you can have an insight as to how the rest of the paper relates to the book. Second, you