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What Is Hiv/Aids? Essay

728 words - 3 pages

What is HIV/AIDS? It is an infected that kills thousands of people all over the world today. and is now the leading cause of death in the black community & all over the world today. Some questions are asked who was the first to catch HIV & how did it spread around the world. The HIV & AIDS virus is a very dangerous disease that sees no race, no color, and no gander. HIV & AIDS don’t even care what age you are or how old you are. It can affect anyone at any time if that put themselves in a situation where they could be at risk of been infected. It is very easy for a person to get affect with this virus and to spread it to others people. HIV & AIDS primarily transmitted by having unprotected sexual intercourse, like anal sex, & oral sex.
Contaminated blood transfusions, needles, & sometimes from mother to child during pregnancy, delivery, or by breastfeeding. Some bodily fluids, such as saliva and Kiss, do not transmit HIV. There are some way you can prevent HIV Infections, primarily though safe sex & other sexual intercourse .But there is no cure for HIV or AIDS but there are some medications & treatments you can take and live a long normal- life. But the medications & treatment are very expensive. But more people need to become aware of the facts of HIV &AIDS in order to help prevent the spread of this horrible virus. We have found no cure or vaccine for this virus. As of now once a person get infected with HIV & AIDS if you don’t have any money. We know his or her fate it is a sad thing when somebody dies from this disease. But life goes on. HIV infections come with three stages. The first is called acute infection and it typically happens within two to six weeks after exposure or becoming infected. After exposure or become infected this is when the body’s immune system put up a fight against HIV. The symptoms of acute infections look similar to those of other viral illnesses and then complete go away as the virus goes into non-symptomatic stages. (Smith) Here are some of the initial...

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