This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Examine The Ways In Which Lang

1735 words - 7 pages

Examine the ways in which language and identity are treated in 'Translations' 'Translations' is set in 1833, in County Donegal, which was soon after the time when Britain had claimed Ireland as part of its empire. The British and the Irish therefore had differing languages, so the British decided to go through the process of naming or renaming Ireland's geographical features. In 'Translations' language and identity are used more as a plot device and plot feature rather than as part of stylistic technique, which is their most common role.When the play was first performed by Friel's own theatre company it was performed in the Irish language, and at the start of the play, all the characters speak Irish as their first language, the English language comes into the script a lot later, which reflects the course of events in Ireland over the past two centuries. All these characters have been brought up speaking the language and it is a fundamental part of their life, culture and identity.English is the second main language in the play. It represents the future to Maire and Owen, and 'a mistake' to Hugh and Manus. The two English speakers come as part of the same assignment, to make a map of the country and to 'see that the place names are ... correct.', but they have greatly differing attitudes towards Ireland and its identity. Captain Lancey sees the Irish as inferior to the English, which is evident when he is willing to evict a whole village of them, over the disappearance and probable death of one Englishman. Yolland however falls in love with Ireland, its language and culture and he feels that 'something is being eroded' by his task of renaming the geographical features of Ireland. Yolland is not the stereotypical English male of the time, because he 'missed the boat' to India and that stereotypical way of life, which would be following his father's wishes.The other two languages used in the play are Greek and Latin, which are spoken only by Hugh and Jimmy. These two classical languages create an identity of intellectualism in their users and it is significant that it is the Irish rather than the English characters who can speak them contradicting Lancey's view of them being inferior.Friel shows us the use of language in several different forms. The first scene where Manus is teaching Sarah to speak shows us that language is used to create communication. This can also apply with the lack of communication between the English and Irish characters, for instance how Maire and Yolland fall in love with the sound of each other, despite not being able to understand a word that the other actually says. Different languages create boundaries of communication and the play shows that a lack of communication through language leads to violence, like when the Donnelly twins are supposed to have hunted after Yolland and when Lancey threatens to terrorize the villagers. One of the problems of using communication through language is that it is a weapon that can be...

Find Another Essay On Examine the ways in which lang

“Examine the ways in which state policies/laws may affect family life”

919 words - 4 pages AS Sociology Essay"Examine the ways in which state policies/laws may affect family life".In this essay I will be writing about what changes state policies and laws have made to the society and how they may affect family life by doing so. There are many policies/laws out there that have had an effect on family life and one of these was the 'Child Support Act' which led to the formation of the 'Child Support Agency'. Other policies/laws include

Examine the different ways in which Shakespeare presents issues connected with the marriage and male relationships in the play "The Taming of the Shrew"

1169 words - 5 pages that's why Baptista Minola (father of Kate and Bianca) was encouraging Kate to get married. The consequences were something the father didn't want to happen to Kate. If Kate had not of got married to Petruchio, Kate would of gone to a Nunnery or she would of become a "Spinster". To examine the different ways in which Shakespeare presents issues I will explore 3 scenes from The Taming of the Shrew and relate the male and female relationships in

Examine the ways in which Shakespeare presents issues connected with marriage and male/female relationships in the play The Taming of the Shrew

848 words - 3 pages as encouragement for Katherine to finally comply with Petruchio's demands: he has tamed her. This shows the audience a socially acceptable Elizabethan marriage in which the female has little say in what happens, she must comply however unrealistic the demands may be. These attitudes extend beyond marriage and demonstrate the social roles of men and women in the late 16th century.As a romantic comedy "The Taming of the Shrew" focuses largely on romantic relationships as they ascend towards marriage, and in doing so, provides an insight into the opinions and attitudes towards males, females and marriage in the Elizabethan era.

Examine the ways in which Shakespeare uses language to give the audience a greater insight into Angelo's character in the play measure for measure

1268 words - 5 pages Examine the ways in which Shakespeare uses language to give the audience a greater insight into Angelo's character The character of Angelo in Shakespeare's Measure for Measure is surely the most complex in the play. To convey the transition of principles in Angelo's character in the play, Shakespeare employs a range of language techniques. Using these techniques, Shakespeare allows the audience to gain a greater insight into Angelo's character

Examine the ways in which instances of inverted order in 'The Turn of the Screw' disrupt prior assumptions about humanity, art, moral or aesthetic values etc

1638 words - 7 pages ‘The Turn of The Screw’ was written during a time in which society was rapidly changing; old views and attitudes were being replaced by the new and challenges arose against what had previously been deemed the acceptable social norm. In ‘The Turn of The Screw’ James presents the reader with a story that is inescapably and purposely ambiguous, or even contrary, to the moral, gender and social assumptions held on to by the

The Ways in Which Muslims Worship in the Mosque

3192 words - 13 pages The Ways in Which Muslims Worship in the Mosque Firstly it is important to comprehend exactly what worship (or Ibadah as it is known in Islam) is. Worship is according to the dictionary definition: 'The reverent love and devotion accorded a deity, an idol, or a sacred object.' (Source: http://www.dictionary.com) Islam would totally reject the part of this definition, which associates worship with an

Exploring the Ways in Which Organisms Use ATP

951 words - 4 pages Exploring the Ways in Which Organisms Use ATP The major energy currency molecule of the cell, ATP, is evaluated in the context of creationism. This complex molecule is critical for all life from the simplest to the most complex. It is only one of millions of enormously intricate nanomachines that needs to have been designed in order for life to exist on earth. This molecule is an excellent example of irreducible

Consequences of Inequality and the Ways in Which are Reproduced

681 words - 3 pages Inequality focuses upon the way that resources are distributed across the whole society. In this distribution there are significant differences for children who come from varying social backgrounds. The study of such differences or inequalities has become one of the main concerns of sociological research in education. Sociologists have also paid attention to the consequences of inequality, and the ways in which inequalities are reproduced and

Ways in Which the Media Has Desensitized People to Violence

825 words - 3 pages saying that they laughed throughout the entirety of it and thought it was very funny. A movie in which a man kills twenty-two people is found humorous and people try to say that there is nothing wrong with the amount of violence being shown. Value is robbed from life when someone can kill ten or twenty people in the movie and still be a likeable and fascinated character. People have become calloused to what death and pain really mean. They have taken

Jack Lang in the Great Depression

1320 words - 5 pages plan that was combated against the banks and the loan obligations, he wanted to take the power away from monetary institutions and give it back to the people.Lang noted upon the following- an adjustment of overseas commitments, internal interest payments (cut interest rates by half) and currency problems in particular the gold standard (which was dictated by Britain).Lang formally submitted his proposals:That the Government of Australia decide to

Examine Which Character Creates Most sympathy within the readers In The Novel 'Of Mice And Men'

839 words - 3 pages Steinbeck exposes the racism that was prevalent at that time in America through the character of Crooks, a sentimental, proud and aloof black man and sadly known as the 'nigger'. He has a very realistic way at looking at the dream maybe as he sees the dream as a way of escaping but knows that there is no way and so speaks of the realization which fills him with pessimism. Yet gets caught up in optimism, and begins to link the dream with heaven

Similar Essays

Beginning With Line 115, Examine The Ways In Which Chaucer Presents Alison In The Miller's Tale

781 words - 3 pages Nikul Patel 17/11/03Beginning with line 115, examine the ways in which Chaucer presents Alison in the Miller's TaleAlison is representative of many things in the miller's tale, for example she is a catalyst for much of the events in the book, and she is also there for purposes of ornamentation. The first and major appearance of Alison is in line 115 to line 162. This is Alison's description, Chaucer is writing the miller's tale as a parody of

Examine And Compare The Ways In Which Pat Barker In Regeneration And

1199 words - 5 pages Examine and compare the ways in which Pat Barker in Regeneration and Wilfred Owen in his poetry explore the nature of life in the trenches. Pat Barker and Wilfred Owen are both successful writers in delivering an insight into trench life from the perspective of a soldier, although in different ways. Owen, being a soldier himself, has had first hand experience of trench life and describes the pity of war, in that war is a waste of young

Examine The Ways In Which Poems Celebrate The Power Of Love

999 words - 4 pages iambic tetrameter and trimeter, which emphasizes the basic rhythm of a song/ballad. Though his poem may seem regular, with four stanzas, an ABABCDCD rhyme scheme and a common meter, it is the poem's hidden intricacies that reveal its deeper meanings. In terms of content, Lovelace's vocabulary suggests freedom and mobility despite writing from prison, with the words 'unconfined' and 'wanton'. His innocence is conveyed through the fact that his poem

“Examine The Ways In Which State Policies/Laws May Affect Family Life”

919 words - 4 pages AS Sociology Essay"Examine the ways in which state policies/laws may affect family life".In this essay I will be writing about what changes state policies and laws have made to the society and how they may affect family life by doing so. There are many policies/laws out there that have had an effect on family life and one of these was the 'Child Support Act' which led to the formation of the 'Child Support Agency'. Other policies/laws include