Examining Genocides In Germany, Armenia, And Darfur

932 words - 4 pages

When people think of the word, ‘holocaust’, they probably think of World War II, Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, and concentration camps. In reality, there have been many holocausts before and since the most famous Holocaust in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945 (Roth). Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary defines the word, ‘holocaust’, as “a thorough destruction involving extensive loss of life especially through fire”. This definition describes the Nazi Holocaust, the Armenian genocide, and genocide in Darfur, to name a few (UHRC).
In 1933, Hitler’s Nazi regime took power in Germany at a time where the people lacked patriotism and were upset with their government. After losing World War I, Hitler’s anti-Semitism mindset was based on his ideals that the “final objective must unswervingly be the removal of the Jews altogether” (Roth, p. 35). He truly believed that the Jews were the source of all of Germany’s problems, which wasn’t the case.
When Hitler’s National Socialist German Workers' Party gained control in 1932 (Roth, p. 22), Hitler could finally put his plan into action. Until his suicide in 1945, his concentration camps around Europe killed approximately 11 million people, both Jews and non-Jews (Victims). The death and destruction displaced many young children and teenagers throughout the 1940s. Their
Many people are aware of the Nazi’s holocaust but not many are aware of the Armenian Genocide that claimed 1.5 million lives or the present-day Darfur Genocide that currently has killed over 400,000 people (UHRC). These are just two tragedies that could also be called holocausts.
The Armenian Genocide was the first genocide of the 20th Century (UHRC, par. 1). The Turkish army invaded Armenia and deported and/or killed Armenians in their homes or temporary residences. The Turks started invading Armenia back in the eleventh century when both Turkey and Armenia were part of the huge Ottoman Empire (UHRC, par. 4). In 1913, “three of the Young Turks helped to gain control of Turkey’s government via a coup” (UHRC, par. 10). They wanted to create a “great and eternal land called Turan with one language and one religion” (UHRC, par. 10).
The genocide began on April 24, 1915, when “300 Armenian political leaders, educators, writers, clergy and dignitaries in Istanbul were taken from their homes, briefly jailed and tortured, then hanged or shot” just for being a non-believer in the Muslim religion (UHRC, par. 19). After this, many Armenian men were being arrested for no real reason. They were then taken and shot or bayoneted by Turkish soldiers. Now, it was time for the Armenian women and children. These people were “ordered to pack a few belongings and be ready to leave home, under the pretext that they were being relocated to a non-military zone for their own safety when they were actually being taken on death marches heading south toward the Syrian...

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