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Exhaustion And Grief In Dana´S Dialogue

1049 words - 5 pages

Dana shook uncontrollably as she knelt over Xacks' broken body. How had everything gone so wrong so quickly? Scott's sudden appearance had unhinged her once calm, (if not unshaken) resolve. Now the dead human who had tried to infect her was back and on top of everything else that had just happened, it was all too much. She could only watch on with shaking limbs and heaving lungs as the zombie tore through the remaining enemies, oblivious to the damage they wrought upon his own body. When the last of the invaders lay broken spilling bodily fluids onto the floor, her former companion reached a hand to her.

Her involuntary revulsion caused an instinctive recoil and the walking flesh pile stopped short. His dead eyes were full of life but still no light shone behind them. Dana wanted so badly to tear her gaze away but they held her like a rabbit in the headlight. After a minute of her refusing his hand, he withdrew it, to her relief.

"I will be outside." Scott spoke slowly, his voice not quite reflecting his once natural form. "We have much to do."

Dana sat sobbing with grief, confused and disorientated by everything, wishing thoroughly that she would cease to exist. After several minutes of facing the reality before her, while not spontaneously winking from existence, the smell of meat, no longer living and the sight of exposed tendons in Xacks' corpse contracting after death, forced her up. Her chest ached with a ferocity that spread into her arms and it hurt to breathe. Still she was way too old to start holding her breath in protest, waiting for the universe to do things her way. Instead she took one last look at the destruction of so much life, including that of her friends and remove herself on shaky legs, to stand in the crisp alien air.

As she sat on the exit ramp, Dana wanted sorely not to look at a strange planet. She didn't want to have to think about new ideas and for the first time since leaving the earth, she wished she was home. What she wouldn't give right now to be back at work, in her mundane job, to be able to switch off into the familiar. But there was nothing familiar here. Every little detail was strange and new, from the colors, to the textures of the alien flora. It made her miss the company all the more.

"You will have to move." Scott voice was loud and clear even though he hadn't turned to face her. "We will need to bring the machinery out that way."

It was clear that the fight was not over yet and for a minute Dana considered asking what to expect, but grief clouded her feeling of self worth an she decided against it.

"You're not Scott are you?" She asked instead.

"I am simply a peripheral of the one you call Zero." He stated plainly.

"Zero?" Dana was normally quick to catch on, maybe it was the shock she was...

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