This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Cost Of Incarceration Essay

1553 words - 6 pages

What is incarceration? Incarceration is the act of placing someone in prison. Incarceration serves as a punishment for criminals due to their actions against the law. It is a solution for keeping the public safe. Prisoners follow a strict rules and schedules while following the culture within the walls among other prisoners. As a result of their crimes, convicts lose their freedom and are place among others who suffer the same fate. Crime is the cause of this establishment, but what are the effects of incarceration on convicts, their relations, and society? As the United States incarceration rate continues to increase, more people are imprisoned behind prison walls. While serving as a punishment to criminals, incarceration can create psychological and economic problems, and society suffers due to the expenses of maintaining prisons.
Incarceration creates psychological problems for incarcerated criminals. Each prisoner faces different challenges, both mentally and physically. Since each prisoner has different experiences, each prisoner is affected differently by being affected by physiological effects created by incarceration. Some of the mental problems can be curable while others have no treatment. One of the mental conditions is dependency. When people are incarcerated, they are stripped of their freedom and independence. Prisoners are forced to follow strict rules of prisons and become dependent on them. Once they brought back into the outside world, they are returned their independence and freedom. Some incarcerated people are unable to function to provide for themselves because they previously relied on prisons. They cannot function independently in society due to their reliance on others. Some prisoners, over time in prisons, lose trust with others and alienated themselves from others due to prisoners exploiting each other. This behavior continues after they are released from prison, and they distant themselves from their family and friends. Distrust can be formed due to isolating themselves from the other prisoners is the best way to keep them out of danger. By cutting themselves from others, they can be afflicted with depression. Distrust can also be formed due to the customs and culture of prison life. In prison, the strong prey upon the weak; therefore, prisoners find ways to show their toughness and strength. Prisoners desire to keep themselves from being tricked and manipulated by others. Another physiological effect of incarceration is the loss of self-worth. Prisoners have no privacy or options during their daily routines. They are constantly watched and forced under prison conditions. These and other degrading acts, over time, give prisoners the sense that their own identity is a prisoner and nothing else (Haney). After prisoners are released, they are struck with psychological problems. Some prisoners experience post-traumatic stress reactions after they leave prison; this is due to physiological lifestyle they experienced...

Find Another Essay On Cost of Incarceration

poo poo Essay

1628 words - 7 pages operational telephone. The ease of implementation of this program has resulted in electronic house arrest becoming a cost-effective alternative; this refers to both financial and social costs. In terms of financial costs, this benefits the public as it saves taxpayers money when compared to the cost of incarceration. In terms of social costs, it benefits both the offenders and the public because being able to maintain important social relations

Community Based Corrections: Viable Alternative to Incarceration

1808 words - 7 pages forms of community-based corrections, which cost less than five dollars a day (Honarvar, 2010). The efficiency by which community corrections reduce cost, prison populations, and decreases this rate judges should disposition to these programs in lieu of incarceration (Honarvar, 2010). The state spends taxpayer money on building correctional facilities and staff to supervise offenders, while the research shows reduced recidivism rates when

Does the U.S.A Imprison Too Many People?

1016 words - 5 pages like he left as he/she came in. Basically what I'm saying is that prisoner's, don't get resources in prison, like job skills, and that if a prisoner leaves prison, he/she can't get a job, because of their criminal record, and they don't have any skills either. Though, this might cost a lot of money, it will save money, because lot's of prisons are overcrowded, and costs lot's of money the the U.S could be using on something else. That is the

Alternatives to Incarceration

901 words - 4 pages Alternatives to Incarceration Ever since the first prison opened in the United States in 1790, incarceration has been the center of the nations criminal justice system. Over this 200 year period many creative alternatives to incarceration have been tried, and many at a much lower cost than imprisonment. It wasn’t until the late 1980’s when our criminal justice systems across the country began experiencing a problem with overcrowding of

Electronic Monitoring

324 words - 2 pages enforcement of nonincarcerative sanctions (Tonry, 179). After the offender has served a period of incarceration and the Provincial Corrections feel the offender is a good candidate he/she may be released on EM. The judge can also make recommendations for the offender to be on EM. The primary purpose of EM is to divert offender from incarceration that can reduce cost, and avoid over-crowding at prisons (Berlin, 77).WHAT IS ELECTRONIC MONITORING a

The Flawed Prison System of America

1292 words - 6 pages jail or prison? Well, that brings us to step four: realizing the benefits of the alternatives to incarceration. Because building prisons puts a terrible strain on most state’s budgets, taxpayers have been more willing to consider programs that might cost less- as long as they also control and punish crimes appropriately. Alternatives saves the taxpayers money along with strengthening families and communities by keeping them together and allowing

Prison and the Alternatives: Is Incarceration the Answer to Crime?

2143 words - 9 pages Prison and the Alternatives: Is Incarceration the Answer to Crime?How well do our prisons reform prisoners? What are the alternatives to prison? What is the best, most cost-effective way of protecting the public? These are some of the questions raised by individuals who are legitimately concerned not only with where their tax dollars are going, but also with what is being done to break the cycle of crime within their representative communities

The Need For Extreme Criminal Justice Reform In California

2537 words - 10 pages . By immediately eliminating incarceration for all non-violent offenses and requiring victim compensation and community service, resources can be committed to preventing crime rather than to the feeding and housing of offenders. E. This is consistent with the findings of the legislature and is cost efficient, requires minimal systemic change, and increases public safety and security. IV.     The Proposal A. "Our

Criminal Justice Reform / Speech Paper with Outline and all Supplements. The need for extreme criminal justice reform in California

2714 words - 11 pages eliminating incarceration for all non-violent offenses and requiring victim compensation and community service, resources can be committed to preventing crime rather than to the feeding and housing of offenders.E. This is consistent with the findings of the legislature and is cost efficient, requires minimal systemic change, and increases public safety and security.IV. The ProposalA. 'Our current criminal justice system appears to be based upon the

The Flaws of Incarceration in America

1662 words - 7 pages The United States has a larger percent of its population incarcerated than any other country. America is responsible for a quarter of the world’s inmates, and its incarceration rate is growing exponentially. The expense generated by these overcrowded prisons cost the country a substantial amount of money every year. While people are incarcerated for a number of reasons, the country’s prisons are focused on punishment rather than reform, and the

Alternatives to Incarceration.This paper is about options available for offenders that do not require jail or prison terms.Raises the question of cost effectiveness

868 words - 3 pages Ever since the first prison opened in the United States in 1790, incarceration has been the center of the nations criminal justice system. Over this 200 year period many creative alternatives to incarceration have been tried, and many at a much lower cost than imprisonment. It wasn't until the late 1980's when our criminal justice systems across the country began experiencing a problem with overcrowding of facilities. This problem forced

Similar Essays

The Penal And Judiciary System: The High Cost Of Incarceration

2280 words - 9 pages and judiciary system has one major positive aspect which is keeping violent criminals off of the streets so they do not harm society. However, the judiciary system needs reform in the incarceration of nonviolent pot offenders. The way of dealing with children whose parents are arrested and the actual prison system needs major reform because they can cause severe and long-lasting psychological problems. Works Cited Aizenman, N.C. "The High Cost

Are Prisons Effective? Essay

1544 words - 6 pages other party will be less willing to break the law and end up in prison as well. Furthermore, punishment itself would satisfy most of society when the criminal is imprisoned. Prison offers law-breakers a chance to receive drug treatment, educational benefits, and as stated before, a chance at rehabilitation. Also, incarceration costs less than leaving criminals out of prisons because the cost of housing inmates is less than the cost of their

Alternative Incarceration:Are Boot Camps An Effective Form Of Incarceration? Introduction & Overview Of The Problem

4890 words - 20 pages investigations of the extent to which prison boot camps meet their two major goals of lower recidivism and reduced costs have produced inconclusive results. In general, studies indicate that boot camps can prove to be a cost-effective alternative to traditional incarceration. The best evidence of this comes from New York, which is home to the nation's largest boot camp (1,500 beds devoted to boot camp prisoners, accounting for nearly 30% of the

Examining The Collectivities That Protect The Existing Incarceration Policies

1414 words - 6 pages Perpetuates Racial Inequality in Criminal Justice.” Law & Society Review 44 (3):805-842. Roberts, Dorothy E. 2004. “The Social and Moral Cost of Mass Incarceration in African American Communities.” Stanford Law Review 56 (5):1271-1305. Scherlen, Renee. 2012. “Never-Ending Drug War: Obstacles to Drug War Policy Termination.” Political Science and politics 45(1):67-73.