Experiences Of Youth In Nazi Germany 1933 1945

1058 words - 4 pages

Young people in Nazi Germany during the period between 1933 and 1945 had many different experiences according to the category of society in which they fell. This was determined by Nazi ideology regarding the supreme importance of maintaining the purity of the Aryan master race. All other ethnic groups were regarded as inferior, and this policy was pursued through force, propaganda and education. Jewish children, Hitler Youth, Swing Kids, and the disabled had very diverse treatment under Hitler's rule. They all had differing experiences due to Hitler's belief in the master race.
The reason for these different experiences is Nazi ideology. Hitler's entire philosophy was based on a racist view of humanity. He believed that the Aryans must struggle against the Jews and defeat them, or be destroyed themselves, ?Those who want to live, let them fight and those who do not want to fight in this world of eternal struggle do not deserve to live.? Some youth groups fitted Hitler?s ideal German, but some did not, and that is the reason why they suffered such brutal experiences.
Jewish youth in Nazi Germany suffered greatly after January 1933 when the Nazis came into power. Some rich Jewish families could afford to leave Germany but many could not. Hitler had made plain his hatred for Jews in Mein Kampf, ?If you cut even cautiously into such a sore, you find like a maggot in a rotting body, often dazzled by the sudden light ? a Jew.? Hitler blamed Jews for all the misfortunes that had fallen Germany. Children at schools were taught specifically anti-Semitic ideas. Jewish students were openly ridiculed by teachers and the bullying of Jews in the playground went unpunished. Hitler believed that if the Jewish children responded by not wanting to go to school, then that served a purpose in itself. Hitler used education to depict his hatred for Jews. From a children?s story book, ??And do you know too, who these bad men are, these poisonous mushrooms of mankind?? the mother continued. Franz slaps his chest in pride: ?Of course I know, mother! They are the Jews!?? Most Jewish people were also sent to various concentration camps all around Germany. Here they were killed off and a process named to this was ?mass extermination.? Hitler did not want a trace of Jewish blood existent in Germany.
The Nazi persecution of the disabled was one component of public health policies which aimed at wiping out all Germans which were not of the Aryan race. These strategies began with forced sterilization which grew to mass murder. Altogether an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 people were sterilized under the law, including children. A maths question as a part of the school syllabus was, ?To keep a mentally ill person costs approximately 4 marks a day. There are 300,000 mentally ill people in care. How much to these people cost to keep in total? How many marriage loans of 1000 marks could be granted with this money?? Many doctors agreed to ?put patients to sleep? without notifying...

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