Explain The Importance Of Piggy In Lord Of The Flies. How Does Golding Present Piggy In The Novel?

665 words - 3 pages

“Grownups know things.” said Piggy. “They ain’t afraid of the dark. They meet and have tea to discuss.” (82) Lord of the Flies, written by William Golding, portrays the microcosm of the outside world, 描写しているthe war going on in the outside world. T: Golding presents Piggy to symbolize law and order, humanism, and physical inferiority--Piggy is portrayed as a boy with much intellectual capacity, yet he does not fully make use of it due to his physical appearance.

The first impression Piggy creates in a reader’s mind is that of physical weaknesses--his slightly plump figure, poor eyesight, and untreated asthma. Physical appearance and good athletic ability are characteristics that make up a likeable boy on the island, therefore Piggy automatically becomes an outcast. However, Golding makes up for this disadvantage by endowing Piggy with enhanced intellect. Throughout the novel, he illustrates law and order--he wants everything to to happen precisely ...view middle of the document...

He makes an effort to give every being the right to be called by their given name, because Piggy is never called by his proper name. Having names and having an identity very much matters to Piggy, because it embodies an orderly system. Additionally, he remains calm, composed and acts rationally. For instance, Piggy strongly believes “there isn’t no beast--not with claws and all that” on the island, whereas all the other boys believe that there is. He understands and believes in science; “Life, said Piggy expansively, “is scientific, that’s what it is….-- but I know there isn’t no fear either.” (72) Although he has the mentality to lead the group on the island, he lacks leadership qualities and doesn’t sync with the other boys. Furthermore, Piggy heavily relies on other people or social thinking. For instance, he believes that holding the conch gives him the right to speak--where in fact, the significance of the conch deteriorates as the novel progresses. Lastly, Piggy is so organized and independent that he can sustain on the island even as an outcast. He represents law, order, and democracy as he is the one that found the conch, and uses it to gather the crowd.

Lastly, Piggy being portrayed as an outcast throughout the novel, Lord of the Flies demonstrates how modern society is structured--group of irrational people with power, subduing the powerless intellectuals. In other words, Piggy’s character is an important allusion to human spirit society in modern civilization. He is the only voice that opposes to Jack’s savagery and animalistic behaviour, which gets brutally suppressed. Golding portrays how the power balance of the two groups gradually tilts over to the irrational group, just because they’ve got might. Even in modern society, intellectuals have to silently suffer tyranny. A real life example is when the Nazis gained power in Germany. For example, Einstein, the epitome of a scientific genius, was forced to stay out of his homeland to avoid what Piggy suffered in fate of Jack.

To conclude, Golding describes Piggy to be physically vulnerable, but portrays him to be a symbol of human spirit and democracy. Since having a dissent is very important in democracy, Piggy played an important role in doing so.

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