Reasons Why Communism Fails In Eastern Europe.

2478 words - 10 pages

Communism in the Eastern Europe was a tragedy. It was condemned because the leaders misused it. It was lack of support from other nations, and there was no efficient solution to save the economy from its downfall. However, it was Gorbachev's reformation that truly brought Communism in Eastern Europe to its end. It proved that Communism in Eastern Europe was just a theory that did not work in reality.Originally, Karl Marx invented the theory of Communism. It was the movement that meant to overthrow the capitalist order by revolution (The Columbia Encyclopedia). Marx's intention was to establish a classless society in which all property would be state owned. The state that was run by workers, or proletariats, instead of ruler; he wanted to create a ruler-less state. Marx thought that the ruthless government of Tsar had already spoiled the workers and sooner or later there would be revolution. It was just a matter of time. Eventually, the Soviet would seek for his ideology of Communism. Ideally, the society provided equal sharing of work, according to ability, and all benefits, according to need. (Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia) The private property was abolished. However, Lenin and Stalin modified Marx's theory of Communism, which altered the actually meaning of the theory. This modification contributed to the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. The reformation of Gorbachev was an excellent example to prove this. Under the rule of Lenin, there could be only one party, which was the Communist, to run the government. Opposition parties were all eliminated. This was different from Marx's originally intention to have a state rule without ruler. Lenin made himself the dictator and the Communist parties held the total power. There were no allow criticizing the government publicly, and freedom of speech was being taken away. There were censorship and propaganda. Private ownership was not allowed; instead, the government imposed the system of collectivization of agriculture. The government confiscated all the agricultural products. There were restrictions to the life of the citizens in almost everyway. The freedom of politic, social, culture, and economic were controlled. Communism, in another word, was totalitarianism. However, Communism is not all that powerful like it seems to be.First of all, the Soviet or the Eastern bloc people never support Communism. The fact that the communist regime in Eastern Europe faced constant opposition had proven this statement. Violence revolutions, form by the Anti-Communists, often occurred. East Germany, Poland, and Hungary were three major examples. Between the years of 1953 - 1956, these three countries had set up violence revolution in the purpose to gain independent from the hands of the Soviet Communism. In 1953, there was an uprising in East Germany (Uprising in East Germany, 1953). According to analyze and reports from the CIA and SED, the uprising originally started in Berlin, and then spread...

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