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Exploration Of Civil Disobedience In Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter From Birmingham Jail, And Plato's From Crito

579 words - 2 pages

Exploration of Civil Disobedience in Sophocles' Antigone, King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, and Plato's From Crito

Civil disobedience spawns a major and widely debated issue by many who established by well-known intelligent scholars and many examples of civil disobedience become displayed. The acts of civil disobedience can be noted in major works such as Sophocles?s Antigone, King?s ?Letter from Birmingham Jail?, or even from Plato?s ?from Crito?. A specific claim exemplified throughout these works make that civil disobedience races in gaining popularity and should remain allowed, and continued to be seen as a solution to reform poorly established laws. A claim represented is, civil disobedience is right. Rhetorically, appeals such as credibility, logic and emotion can provide support for these claims.

Creditability sources that support this appeal and claim about the commonness how civil disobedience is good come from Antigone, ?from Crito?, and ?Letter from Birmingham Jail?. The creditability shown in Antigone is represented through the author Sophocles. Sophocles is a credible author who used Antigone as an example of civil disobedience against an unjust law. A paraphrased quotation from Antigone to support this idea is, ?I am the one who buried the body.? The body referring to Antigone?s brother, this determination was to go against the law established by Creon. When a particular law is poorly established, someone is bound to defy it. Namely, Antigone was bound to break this law and disobey its authority. Credibility is also shown in ?from
Crito?; the prisoner who taught philosophy. Plato was imprisoned because he taught philosophy to people and he is credible for not doing wrong. In King?s ?Letter from Birmingham Jail?, it is credible because it is known that Martin...

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