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Explore The Ways The Relationship Between Atticus And Scout Is Presented In `to Kill A Mockingbird`

3884 words - 16 pages

'To Kill a Mockingbird' is a novel that was written in the 1960s, but Harper Lee decided to set the novel in the Depression era of the 1930s in a small town in Alabama. Lee provided her readers with a historical background for the affairs of that time and in doing so she exposed the deeply entrenched history of the civil rights in South America. Like the main characters in this novel, Lee grew up in Alabama; this made it easier for her to relate to the characters in the novel as she would have understood what they would have experienced during the period when racism, discrimination and inequality was on the increase within the American society.
Even though, this novel was set in the depression era, Scout goes through times in her life when she learns moral lessons through the education taught by Atticus, this results in empathy being shown and Scout also learns to fight with her head rather than her fist. However, as she faces hardship and goes through difficult times, seeing as her father is defending Tom Robinson (who is a black man accused of raping Mayella Ewell), she is forced to grow up and enter the adult world. As this is the case, Scout finds herself helping Atticus and this increases the relationship between father and daughter since Scout sees her father as a good role model. Even though Atticus isn’t seen as an ordinary father he is still seen as role model by his children, this implies that he must have done something right to make them approve of him. In comparison to Mr Ewell, Atticus is seen as a role model as he doesn’t smoke or drink. These bad habits that Atticus has refrained from have had an impact on the way his children have been brought up. Unlike Bob, Atticus cares for his children and tries to help them in all situations, whereas Mr Ewell left Mayella to fend for herself. This shows that as a person Atticus is more superior even though both Bob and Atticus are from the white community. Lee used contrast to portray the Finch’s and Ewell’s as she thought that it would be good to get a view on the different types of families even though they are both from the same community. Furthermore, as Atticus is seen as a role model he is challenged by Scout. Atticus is challenged as Scout is determined to find out if he is a good father who doesn’t only do things for the well-being of Maycomb County, but also does things for her by being an ideal father. At times, this has an effect on both Atticus and Scout, as Atticus starts being honest with his daughter. This honesty also leads to Scout having faith and trust in her father. The qualities and characteristics that Atticus and Scout have, enhances’ the relationship between them as they both learn that they need each other’s support to overcome difficulties and hardships.
In chapter 3, the relationship between Scout and Atticus is presented through the way Scout has been taught. As Scout is educated by Atticus empathy is shown from Scout as her father explains to her why she...

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