Exploring The Depths Of Hamlet's Character

1090 words - 4 pages

Introduction
Hamlet’s madness, authentic? This question has been debated by scholars and professors throughout the ages.

This lecture will explore the depths of Prince Hamlet’s character in Shakespeare’s original play, as well as Michael Almereyda’s modern interpretation of this tragedy.
/
Through the use of cinematic tools and critical literacy, the Bard and Almereyda both equally portray the theme of madness, in their respective media. Shakespeare and Almereyda carefully constructed their representations of the Prince based on the surrounding cultural and religious attitudes, values and beliefs of the eras they lived in.
/
Shakespeare portrays Hamlet’s madness as spurious with purpose towards the deception of the king; in contrast to Almereyda’s version in which the Prince’s thirst for revenge genuinely drives him to the brink of insanity.
/
Shakespeare creates his representation of Hamlet through the use of a mix of Elizabethan cultural and religious attitudes, values and beliefs. This allowed the Bard to deliver a strong understanding and appeal to his Elizabethan audience.
/
On the other hand, Almereyda takes a different approach in which he portrays Hamlet’s madness as genuine. Almereyda cunningly massages modern day attitudes, values and beliefs into the precise construction of Hamlet in order to maximise his appeal to a modern audience.

Body
Let’s start with Shakespeare’s representation of the prince.

Shakespeare portrays Hamlet as a tragic hero, a man of radical contradictions. In the play, the Prince meets his father’s death with a strong sense of mourning, one which quickly turns to a lust for revenge when he finds out that his father was murdered by his uncle. Gertrude at this point notices Hamlet’s grief and offers up words of sincerity, which are on screen.

Gertrude to Hamlet:
"Thou know'st tis common, all that lives must die/Passing through nature to eternity" (Act 1, Scene 2)

This, from the perspective of others around him, is when the Prince apparently begins plummet into insanity. On return from his exile later in the play, his insanity remains comparatively hidden as Hamlet now confronts the paradoxical truth in that, in order to avenge his father, he must commit the very same act for which he seeks revenge.
This representation of the Prince is created through both direct and indirect characterisation and critical literacy. Hamlet says more than once that his madness is unauthentic and is only acting in order to fool the king.
Evidence of his acting is presented on screen;

Hamlet to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern:
"I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw."
(Act 2, Scene 2)

Hamlet to Gertrude:
"I essentially am not in madness,
But mad in craft."
(Act 3, Scene 4)

Polonius to Hamlet:
"Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.”
(Act 2, Scene 2)

Shakespeare makes it evident that Hamlet’s madness was merely feigned so...

Find Another Essay On Exploring the Depths of Hamlet's Character

The Neural Depths of Our Ever-Changing Cognition

1313 words - 5 pages The Neural Depths of Our Ever-Changing Cognition There are many theories that scientists, in-due circumstances, try to extrapolate as to why the brain goes through the ever-changing neuronal alterations that it goes through because of focused attention. One of these theories is one that many neuroscientists aptly call neuroplasticity: this theory, as some philosophers would have us to believe, goes against the current dogma of the

The Neural Depths of Our Ever-Changing Cognition

1793 words - 7 pages The Neural Depths of Our Ever-Changing Cognition There are many theories that scientists, in-due circumstances, try to extrapolate as to why the brain goes through the ever-changing neuronal alterations that it goes through because of focused attention. One of these theories is one that many neuroscientists aptly call neuroplasticity. This theory, as some philosophers would have us to believe, goes against the current dogma of the

Isolation as the Root of Hamlet's Torment

1667 words - 7 pages Elsinore. Yet considering any of these personages as true friends offends Shakespeare's complex relational web, leaving only Horatio as a companion for the prince.     Though a seemingly minor character, Horatio holds a deceptively important role in this drama, both as Hamlet's supporter and as a key to the many turns of the plot. Proof of this first develops within the opening act when Hamlet guilelessly greets him, "Sir, my good friend" (1.2, 163

Exploring Existentialism and the Character Leanord in the Film, Memento

1978 words - 8 pages Exploring Existentialism and the Character Leanord in the Film, Memento Although Christopher Nolan does not acknowledge any philosophical basis for Memento, the film provides a character, Leonard Shelby, who serves as an example of several aspects of existentialism. Through Leonard, Memento illustrates Soren Kierkegaard's idea of truth as subjectivity, Freidrich Nietzsche's notion that God is dead, and Jean-Paul Sartre's writings on the

Overcoming the Depths of Darkness: The Hrrors of the Hitler's Conquering of Eastern Europe

1756 words - 7 pages . Depicted through Elie Wiesel's heart wrenching words in the memoir, Night, the horrors of the Hitler's conquering of eastern Europe come to life during which Wiesel strives to sustain his faith in religion as well as his innocent view of humanity previous to his encounters and the bond that connects him to his family. Through these encounters in his teenage years, Wiesel overcame the depths of the Kingdom of Night, where he fell victim to the trap so

Exploring the importance of hearing

562 words - 2 pages Exploring the importance of hearing senseIntroductionSounds are created when objects vibrate. The vibrations of an object cause molecules the objects surrounding medium to vibrate as well, and this vibration in turn causes pressure changes in the medium. So I will be conducting an experiment on how it is to go along in everyday life without being able to hear.MethodI put earbuds in my ear along with headphones and proceeded to interact with my

Shakespeare's Depiction of Hamlet's State of Mind in the Soliloquies

1882 words - 8 pages dutiful revenge he has imposed unconvincingly upon himself. The audience reaction could be, why more delay? Get on with it! The sixth and final soliloquy has a context that is crucial to the audiences' understanding of his character development. He finally accepts the immoral act of murderous revenge as his necessary duty. Hamlet's state of mind is such that he has driven himself mad with tormenting himself on his

An Instrument of life; Hamlet's contribution to the play

975 words - 4 pages fate. His inability to overcome insecurity, procrastination, and an over analytical mind contribute, overwhelmingly, to his downfall. Hamlet allows negative character attributes to steer his life, the point being, He is an instrument of his own indecision, which spawned from flaws within his character. Establishing Hamlet's sanity is a difficult task. It's stability in his life is questionable, but his contemplation of madness has left him

Exploring Amanda of The Glass Menagerie

2099 words - 8 pages Exploring Amanda of The Glass Menagerie       Tennessee Williams has a gift for character. Not many playwrights do, and even fewer possess the unique ability to craft a character as paradoxical and complex as Amanda Wingfield. In The Glass Menagerie, Amanda is a very difficult character to understand because of her psychological disposition. Williams realizes this and provides the reader with a character description in hopes of making the

Exploring Causes of The Great Depression

746 words - 3 pages Exploring Causes of The Great Depression Introduction The Wall Street crash of 29 Oct 1929 and the Great Depression that followed were such a shock to most Americans that some early attempts to explain their causes blamed sunspot activity or medieval prophecy. A few held it to be divine retribution on a people who had indulged themselves in a decade of hedonism after World War I and were due for a sobering

Exploring the Theme of Pride and Prejudice

2400 words - 10 pages . Elizabeth accepts Wickham's story without exploring it fully because she believes that he is a gentleman and so is trustworthy. This is another example of how first impressions can be wrong, as Wickham is not a gentleman as Elizabeth first thought and has not told Elizabeth the whole truth about why Darcy treated him wrongly. When Elizabeth finds out the vital information that Wickham has not mentioned her opinion of both Wickham and Darcy

Similar Essays

Through The Depths Of Hell Essay

1712 words - 7 pages through the use of diction to conjure up: “hell-dog,” depicting Argenti as anything but loyal. This emphasizes Alighieri’s hostility towards Argenti since in life Argenti had been a miscreant, to Alighieri, a sworn traitor. Dante describes Argenti as “filthy,” the word “filth” bringing to mind the lowness and depravity of Argenti’s character. Alighieri’s use of imagery that he incorporates when Dante wishes for Argenti to “weep and wail for all

Analysis Of Prince Hamlet's Character In William Shakespeare's Play

1854 words - 7 pages taking revenge is illegal but more importantly in violent situations is socially and morally unacceptable. This makes it just as relevant today, as in the Elizabethan conflict. The ghost of Hamlet's father can be seen as either a spirit, as shown traditionally or as a conscience or apparition of the dead. Hamlet's careful consideration and reasoning for and against revenge and the condemnation of his own character and

This Essay I Wrote For My English Class. It Describes The Importance Of Hamlet's Soliloquys On His Character Development

1151 words - 5 pages Essay Topic: Review Hamlet's soliloquies and write an essay that summarizes the development of his tragic character through these speeches.Among some of the most exemplary and insightful passages in English literature exists the Hamlet soliloquies. They produce age-old questions that man seeks to answer, yet fears to be answered. Perhaps, among these examples the point is to analyse the questions and not the answers drawn. Through Hamlet each

The Neural Depths Of Our Ever Changing Cognition

1589 words - 6 pages The Neural Depths of Our Ever-Changing Cognition There are many theories that scientists, in-due circumstances, try to extrapolate as to why the brain goes through the ever-changing neuronal alterations that it goes through because of focused attention. One of these theories is one that many neuroscientists aptly call neuroplasticity: this theory, as some philosophers would have us to believe, goes against the current dogma of the