Exploring Why Britain Was Able To Continue To Hold Out Against Germany Between June 1940 And The End Of 1943

2307 words - 9 pages

Exploring Why Britain was Able to Continue to Hold Out Against Germany Between June 1940 and the End of 1943

The epoch of 1940 to the end of 1943 established that Britain was a
great nation, with an intelligent leader, an invulnerable position,
and loyal allies, that was able to hold out even with meagre resources
and heavy fire from a country across the Channel. There are four main
reasons why this was so, the first; Hitler did not want to attack
England in the first place, and therefore operation sealion was not a
realistic plan, secondly; Hitler made many mistakes and therefore
failed to ruin Britain, thirdly; Britain was saved by others, and
lastly; that Britain saved itself in numerous ways. The most
significant of these reasons is the way in which it saved itself.

Hitler did not want to try to invade Britain in the first place, and
because of this he never put his heart and soul into destroying it,
which allowed Britain to hold out between 1940 and 1943. Hitler proved
this theory by never getting the means to carry out an invasion, by
showing his racial beliefs in ‘Mein Kampf’, by delaying his troops at
Dunkirk, and by showing his full intentions to invade the USSR.
Firstly, he focused only on the field army, and consequently neither
the Navy nor the Air Force was ever fully integrated into the plans
for Germany’s future, as Hitler confirmed at the Battle of Britain.
The types of planes in the German Air force were geared towards
supporting the Army in battles, like the Stuka, and therefore had the
capacity to fly only a short time, barely twenty minutes of bombing
bouts over Britain. Hitler knew that to attack Great Britain, he would
need a strong Navy and Air Force, neither of which he had. Hitler
showed this lack of preparation, when at the start of the Battle of
the Atlantic, the Germans found themselves with only twenty U-boats
available for ocean-going patrols. The U-boats were one of Germany’s
greatest assets, and in the early years the allies suffered enormously
from the carnage caused by them, this is shown by the way that U-boat
destruction was given priority in January 1943.

Hitler wish to create a smokescreen behind which he could carry out ‘Barbarossa,’
his incessant struggle to invade the USSR, which had its last push in
1942, by which time 3,050,000 men had been killed trying do it, which
is much more than during the attempt to take Britain. Hitler believed
that the British were a race inline with Germany, and would rather
have been allies with the Empire, than enemies, which shows that his
desires were not destroy it. The final proof that he did not wish to
have to invade England, was shown at Dunkirk. Here Hitler had the
chance to strike and invade Britain, but didn’t take it; he delayed
his forces before he attacked the town, which gave Britain more time
...

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