F. Scott Fitzergerald "Great Gatsby" Interplay Of Reality And Illusion

690 words - 3 pages

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is considered a novel that embodies America in the 1920s. In it, the narrator, Nick Carroway, helps his neighbor Jay Gatsby reunite with Daisy Buchanan, with whom he has been in love with since 5 years before, during World War I. The affair between the two fails, however, and ends in Gatsby being shot and killed. The reason that this was inevitable is that Gatsby created a fantasy so thoroughly that he became part of it, and he fell with it when reality came crashing down.The basis of all of this is Gatsby's obsession with Daisy and with meeting her. He did not want to deal with the reality that confronted him upon returning from the war. Fortunately, he had 'an extraordinary gift, a romantic readiness,' and he found in Daisy someone to focus this on. She is perfection to him, something for which he can strive, so he puts all of his energy into finding her again. He uses his inherited money to travel around the country, searching; when he runs out, he goes into the drug business, then oil, then liquor. He clips out articles about Daisy from every newspaper he can find; he buys a huge, romantic house that he hopes will merit her approval. The parties that he throws every night in hopes that she will come become almost famous for their extravagance and the variety of people that come.A result of this is that Gatsby creates an illusion around himself, also. His past is shrouded in mystery and speculation: some favorites of the party-goers' theories on why he is so free and generous with his resources are that he once killed a man and that he was a German spy during the war. He does nothing to discourage these rumours; rather, he often adds to them. He lets people believe that he was an Oxford man and that his money was inherited from his father, when in fact he only attended Oxford for a short time and his money all came from outside his family. Jay...

Find Another Essay On F. Scott Fitzergerald "Great Gatsby" Interplay of reality and illusion

Money and Corruption in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2579 words - 10 pages Money and Corruption in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby During the time in our country's history called the roaring twenties, society had a new obsession, money. Just shortly after the great depression, people's focus now fell on wealth and success in the economic realm. Many Americans would stop at nothing to become rich and money was the new factor in separation of classes within

Critical analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1164 words - 5 pages From Rags to Riches with No AvailFor years, America has been known as the land of the riches, immigrants from all over the world flood to America to claim their own piece of the road paved with gold. F. Scott Fitzgerald knew about this American dream all to well and portrayed his opinion of it in his novel The Great Gatsby. Jay Gatsby was certain that wealth was the solution to Daisy's heart, and it was because of this misconception that led to

Literary Analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1071 words - 5 pages The novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, takes place in Long Island around the roaring twenties during the prohibition era. The fictional character and narrator Nick Carraway talks about his experiences with the people of Long Island, which is divided into two parts, East and West Egg. After living in West egg, Nick soon realizes how selfish and negligent the people of Long Island are. The only character that is genuinely a good

Symbols and Symbolism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

620 words - 2 pages Symbolism in The Great Gatsby Symbolism is able to produce immense emotions. Fitzgerald applies symbolism to three of the most significant characters in "The Great Gatsby" to illustrate incisive sentiments. Fitzgerald's description of Tom Buchanan's colossal house signifies Tom and his values. The red and white colors of the Buchanan's mansion represent Tom's personality. Red customarily exemplifies impurity and boldness, while

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby - The Power of Money

678 words - 3 pages , in search of the power that enables them to live. But, money can play many parts in the drama of life. It can represent or give the illusion of wealth, prestige, nobility, and power. Those that seek to harness its powers must also strive to conquer its ability to destroy and corrupt. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, the repeated image of money, no matter in what form or through whom it is portrayed, is used to such an extent that it

A Lifestyle of Greed: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1450 words - 6 pages The epigraph of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, written by Thomas Parke D’Invilliers, gives an insight to the overarching idea of using wealth to attain the interest of a lover in the book and the events that may take place and reads: Then wear the gold hat, if that will move her; If you can bounce high, bounce for her too, Till she cry “Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover, I must have you!” can be interpreted to signify the

The Characters of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2085 words - 8 pages The Characters of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby        In The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main characters Tom and Gatsby are both similar and different in their attitudes and their status. Both Tom and Gatsby have attained great wealth and live in very lavish conditions. They differ greatly, on the other hand, in the way that they acquired this wealth, and the way in which they treat other people. Even though

A Critical Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1615 words - 6 pages A Critical Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a universal and timeless literary masterpiece. Fitzgerald writes the novel during his time, about his time, and showing the bitter deterioration of his time. A combination of the 1920s high society lifestyle and the desperate attempts to reach its illusionary goals through wealth and power creates the essence behind The Great Gatsby

A Stylistic Study of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2375 words - 10 pages Abstract: The Great Gatsby, one of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpieces, is viewed as the first step thatAmerican fiction has taken since Henry James. The paper attempts to study and unveil its writing skills and fivemajor elements of this great novel from a stylistic perspective for better understanding and appreciation of itsconsummate artistry.Key words: writing skills; stylistic elements; artistry1. IntroductionF. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940

"The Great Gatsby", F. Scott Fitzgerald - Critism of American Society.

1410 words - 6 pages "The Great Gatsby is a severe indictment of the value system of a particular segment of American society in the twenties."With close reference to the novel, examine the major issues that F. Fitzgerald explores and faults he exposes.----------On the surface, "The Great Gatsby" is a tragic love story but the theme, is in fact a harsh criticism on the American society in the 1920s. The author, F. Scott Fitzgerald explores the disintegration of the

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1240 words - 5 pages the book The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the narrator, Nick Carraway, believes Gatsby to be a great person with a “gorgeous” personality. It is Nick’s perceptions of Gatsby that encourage the reader to also find him “great.” Gatsby, through his actions, his dreams, and his heart, distinguishes himself from the “foul dust” and makes himself “worth the whole damn bunch put together.” Gatsby creates an illusion for others, as he manages to

Similar Essays

Truth Revealed In "The Great Gatsby" By F. Scott Fitzergerald

668 words - 3 pages In the world people try to hide things from each other but one way or another they find out what they are hiding. In the Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the secrecy and deceit practiced by Jay, Daisy, and Myrtle leads to inevitable tragedy when the truths are revealed.Jay failed to realize that if you tell a lie most of the time they tend to come to a boil and burst. For example, 'My family have been prominent, well-to-do people in this

Illusion And Reality In The Great Gatsby

1584 words - 6 pages Illusion and Reality in The Great Gatsby       The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is a novel about one man's disenchantment with the American dream. In the story we get a glimpse into the life of Jay Gatsby, a man who aspired to achieve a position among the American rich to win the heart of his true love, Daisy Fay. Gatsby's downfall was in the fact that he was unable to determine that concealed boundary between reality and

The Red Badge Of Courage, The Great Gatsby By Scott Fitzergerald

554 words - 2 pages THE GREAT GATSBYThe Great Gatsby by Scott Fitzgerald embodies maythemes, however the most salient one relates to thecorruption of the American Dream. The American Dream isthat each person no matter who he or she is can becomesuccessful in life by his or her own hard work. Thedream also embodies the idea of a self-sufficient man,an entrepreneur making it successful for himself. TheGreat Gatsby is about what happened to the Americandream in the

"The Great Gatsby" By: F. Scott Fitzgerald The Tragic Result Of The American Dream In It's False Reality

746 words - 3 pages The Great Gatsby, a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Has a central theme, the American Dream and it's tragic result of those who attempt to capture its false reality. For Jay Gatsby, the dream becomes real through wealth and power, and he maintains that all this glory will result in happiness. To get this bliss Jay chooses to use the drive of love to justify the illegal ways of reaching "the American Dream". Many of the 19th century