This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

F. Scott Fitzgerald's Babylon Revisited Essay

2189 words - 9 pages

Everyone makes mistakes in their lifetimes and whether they are big or small, the mistakes people make and the ways that they atone for those mistakes define who they truly are. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story “Babylon Revisited”, Fitzgerald proves using symbolism, point-of-view, and tone, that no matter how hard one tries to hide them, the mistakes one make in the past stay with them forever, setting the tone for the future.
The past is symbolized by several elements within the story, primarily by people, places and things. Early in the story, Charlie brings up an old acquaintance, Claude Fessenden, while talking to Alix the bartender. According to Alix, Claude Fessenden has run up a bill of over thirty thousand francs at the Ritz, gave a bad check to pay his debt, and is no longer welcome to return to the bar. Charlie knew Claude from his rambunctious days during the bull market, but now he’s “all bloated up” (BABYLON), bereft by the crash. The next day, during lunch with his daughter, Honoria, two more figures from Charlie’s past come into play - Lorraine and Duncan, who are old friends of “a crowd who had helped them make months into days in the lavish times of three years ago” (BABYLON). They are instantly drawn to Charlie, and force him to remember the years he so vehemently tries to forget; questioning in amazement the sober man standing before them. Charlie shoos the two along as best as he can without insult, as he knows these people are not good for him or his daughter to be around. They are the living embodiment of the events of his past, and in order to be a new person, his old friends cannot be a part of his life. Charlie’s daughter Honoria is nine years old, practically an adult in Charlie’s eyes. He missed out on the last three years of her life, and feels an urge to engrain some of himself into his child, but as Charlie put it, “It was hopeless to try to know her in so short a time” (BABYLON). Honoria is a constant reminder of his actions, how he made Paris his own personal playground while abandoning his daughter for more entertaining things, namely alcohol and hijinks.
Certain places seem to hit a nerve in Charlie, provoking memories that he’d rather forget. Prague is an example of this. He has avoided going back to America after his whirlwind around Paris, and has started up business again where his reputation is far less controversial, where “They don’t know about me” (BABYLON). The Ritz bar, where Charlie begins and ends the story is also a reminder of his past. In the days of years before, the bar had been overrun with Americans, newly rich and drunk on French wine; however, when Charlie visits the bar again, it seemed almost a different place, quiet and dignified. “It had gone back to France” (BABYLON). The stark contrast of then and now gives a sobering perspective to a once drunk and lavish hangout. All around the city, Charlie comes across memories of his past he sees a homey, casual restaurant selling a five...

Find Another Essay On F. Scott Fitzgerald's Babylon Revisited

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1668 words - 7 pages Peter Thewissen Mr. Gilbert English III 19 April 2014 Title In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel, The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald discusses many themes of the 1920s, with a specific focus on the rich and idle class, the “old money,” those whose wealth allows them to be careless and destructive without consequences. In the novel, this group of people is characterized by Tom and Daisy- a couple who moves leisurely through life, destroying

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1836 words - 8 pages , has been corrupted. All of these elements blend together to form a corrupt and vile society that is a reflection of today's. Works Cited Bloom, Harold. F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. New York: Infobase, 2010. Print. Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print Goldberg, Carey. "Materialism is Bad for You, Studies Say." The New York Times. 8 Feb. 2006: 1. Web. Morin, Rich. "Rising Share

A Stylistic Study of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2375 words - 10 pages Abstract: The Great Gatsby, one of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpieces, is viewed as the first step thatAmerican fiction has taken since Henry James. The paper attempts to study and unveil its writing skills and fivemajor elements of this great novel from a stylistic perspective for better understanding and appreciation of itsconsummate artistry.Key words: writing skills; stylistic elements; artistry1. IntroductionF. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940

The American Dream in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1145 words - 5 pages The American Dream in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is a brilliant illustration of life among the new rich during the 1920s, people who had recently amassed a great deal of wealth but had no corresponding social connections. The novel is an intriguing account about love, money and life during the 1920s in New York. It illustrates the society and the associated beliefs, values and dreams of

The Characters of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2085 words - 8 pages The Characters of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby        In The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main characters Tom and Gatsby are both similar and different in their attitudes and their status. Both Tom and Gatsby have attained great wealth and live in very lavish conditions. They differ greatly, on the other hand, in the way that they acquired this wealth, and the way in which they treat other people. Even though

Money and Corruption in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

2579 words - 10 pages Money and Corruption in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby During the time in our country's history called the roaring twenties, society had a new obsession, money. Just shortly after the great depression, people's focus now fell on wealth and success in the economic realm. Many Americans would stop at nothing to become rich and money was the new factor in separation of classes within

Daisy's love in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby"

1108 words - 4 pages In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, thecharacter of Daisy Buchanan has many instances whereher life and love of herself, money, and materialismcome into play. Daisy is constantly portrayed assomeone who is only happy when things are being givento her and circumstances are going as she has plannedthem. Because of this, Daisy seems to be the characterthat turns Fitzgerald's story from a tale of waywardlove to a saga of unhappy

A Critical Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1615 words - 6 pages A Critical Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a universal and timeless literary masterpiece. Fitzgerald writes the novel during his time, about his time, and showing the bitter deterioration of his time. A combination of the 1920s high society lifestyle and the desperate attempts to reach its illusionary goals through wealth and power creates the essence behind The Great Gatsby

Horrors of WWI Reflected in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Writing

3156 words - 13 pages Certain authors, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, wanted to reflect the horrors that the world had experienced not a decade ago. In 1914, one of the most destructive and pointless wars in history plagued the world: World War I. This war destroyed a whole generation of young men, something one would refer to as the “Lost Generation”. Modernism was a time that allowed the barbarity of the war to simmer down and eventually, disappear altogether. One

Consequences of Nick Carraway as Narrator of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1441 words - 6 pages , 1983. Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1992. Hobsbawm, Eric. The Age of Extremes. New York: Pantheon, 1994. Raleigh, John Henry. "F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby." Trilling 99-103. Trilling, Lionel. "F. Scott Fitzgerald." Critical Essays on Scott Fitzgerald's "Great Gatsby." Ed. Scott Donaldson. Boston: Hall, 1984. 13-20.

The Great Gatsby and F. Scott Fitzgerald's Contribution to American Culture/Values

1492 words - 6 pages Imagine a well written tale infused with philosophical ideas and you have F. Scott Fitzgerald's work, "The Great Gatsby". The ancient Greeks drew upon the epics "Homer" and the "Iliad" to emphasize certain moral attributes and ideas. Fitzgerald brings to us, in the same spirit as Homer, a story that leaves a lasting impression on society. American tradition, culture, and values are the underlying objects of analysis in this novel. Fitzgerald's

Similar Essays

Charlie As The Victim Of Circumstance In F. Scott Fitzgerald's Babylon Revisited

572 words - 2 pages Charlie as the Victim of Circumstance in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Babylon Revisited The story's protagonist, Charlie Wales, is less a victim of bad luck than of circumstance, both socio-economic and personal. Charlie does not deserve Marion's continued denial of custody of his daughter, but the story is less about what Charlie does or does not deserve than how easily one's life can spin out of control due to unforeseen circumstance. Marion

Bad Behavior In Babylon Revisited By F. Scott Fitzgerald

965 words - 4 pages one drink as he promise himself to have every day, and because he wanted to prove to his sister in law that he is not the same person anymore. He tried all that he could to have his daughter to move with him In conclusion the story applies to one of the mercy court value which is integrity meaning that Charlie was very honest about what he wanted to do for his daughter and he admit that he use to be an alcoholic, and he regret the life that he use to live and that is why he is sober now. Reference Fitzgerald, Scott F. "Babylon Revisited." Loeffelholz, Mary. The Norton Anthology of American Literature . New York: Norton & Company , 1931. 1839-1853.

Connecting Babylon Revisited, My Life, And The Life Of F. Scott Fitzgerald

3008 words - 12 pages recommends it or not. Attention should be given to both the technical points of the writing and the author's biography. Take, for example, F. Scott Fitzgerald's "Babylon Revisited." At first glance, the story wasn't that hard to understand, so it was a good opportunity to study a piece of 20th century American literature in a deeper way.    "Babylon Revisited" is often credited for being one of Fitzgerald's greatest

Comparing Hills Like White Elephans By Ernest Hemingway And Babylon Revisited By F. Scott Fitzgerald

2392 words - 10 pages Comparing Hills Like White Elephans by Ernest Hemingway and Babylon Revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald At first glance it seems that the two short stories “Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway and “Babylon Revisited” by F. Scott