This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

F. Scott Fitzgerald "The Great Gatsby": Demonstrate Nick Carraway's Maturation As The Events Of The Summer Of 1922 Unfold

682 words - 3 pages

As the events of the summer of 1922 unfold, the character of Nick Carraway matures greatly in the book The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. In the beginning of the novel, Nick is very naïve and doesn’t notice faults in people. Nick also realizes that materialism is wrong and that if he must give up his morals to be successful in the east, it is not worth it.Nick has a very naïve personality in the beginning of the novel. He is unaware of how to judge the truth in people and doesn’t see many faults with them. As the summer unfolds though, he learns how to accurately judge individuals and realizes that what he thought at first is not the truth at all. For example, he thinks that Daisy is a beautiful woman with admirable traits and even makes the mistake of liking her. “I’ve heard it said that ...view middle of the document...

...” (Fitzgerald 170). This shows us that his view on the Buchanan’s changed greatly and that his judgement matured throughout the book because he could not see them from this light before.Nick’s views on materialism and his desire to become a rich bond man change throughout the novel as he matures. “The Middle West now seemed like the ragged edge of the universe – so I decided to go east and learn the bond business.” (Fitzgerald 9). In the beginning, we are told that Nick has come east to gather riches in the bonds business. He comes east because he is no longer complacent in the west and believes that the excitement is non-existent there. However, this is what his views are when he is still young and immature. Over the summer of 1922, he matures enough to realize that materialism causes people to become greedy and selfish and self-centred. Money is the reason that any of the characters in the novel act as immature as they do. Since they have lived sheltered lives they are used to getting away with anything. At first, the idea of wealth is greatly appealing to Nick, but by the end of the novel he decided that if the price to pay for wealth and a luxurious lifestyle is your morals and ethics, the price is too high.Nick Carraway matures a great deal in the novel The Great Gatsby. “Perhaps we possessed some deficiency…that made us inadaptable to Eastern life.” (Fitzgerald 167). I believe that this deficiency, in Nick, was the fact that he matured. He grew up, and in doing so became a responsible young man as opposed to Tom and Daisy who stayed forever young, running from their problems. “After Gatsby’s death the east was haunted for me… so…I decided to come back home.” (Fitzgerald 167). He comes to the conclusion that the east is where the fun is but the fun is not fun, it is an illusion that is fed by the greed and materialism of the people.

Find Another Essay On F. Scott Fitzgerald - "The Great Gatsby": Demonstrate Nick Carraway's Maturation As The Events Of The Summer Of 1922 Unfold

Nick Carraway as Narrator of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

1108 words - 4 pages The Role of Nick Carraway as Narrator of The Great Gatsby     In The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald presents a specific portrait of American society during the roaring twenties and tells the story of a man who rises from the gutter to great riches. This man, Jay Gatsby, does not realize that his new wealth cannot give him the privileges of class and status. Nick Carraway who is from a prominent mid-western family tells the story. Nick

Character Analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1137 words - 5 pages The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, revolves around wealthy New Yorkers living in the 1920s, or the “jazz age”. Tom and Daisy Buchanan are incredibly rich from inheriting family money, unlike Jay Gatsby who worked his way, although possibly illegally, to his fame and riches. The only motive on his mind was to impress Daisy, whom he fell in love with years ago. What he fails to realize is that Daisy never wanted her husband, Tom, or

Literary Analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1071 words - 5 pages The novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, takes place in Long Island around the roaring twenties during the prohibition era. The fictional character and narrator Nick Carraway talks about his experiences with the people of Long Island, which is divided into two parts, East and West Egg. After living in West egg, Nick soon realizes how selfish and negligent the people of Long Island are. The only character that is genuinely a good

"The Great Gatsby", F. Scott Fitzgerald - Critism of American Society

1410 words - 6 pages "The Great Gatsby is a severe indictment of the value system of a particular segment of American society in the twenties."With close reference to the novel, examine the major issues that F. Fitzgerald explores and faults he exposes.----------On the surface, "The Great Gatsby" is a tragic love story but the theme, is in fact a harsh criticism on the American society in the 1920s. The author, F. Scott Fitzgerald explores the disintegration of the

Critical analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1164 words - 5 pages From Rags to Riches with No AvailFor years, America has been known as the land of the riches, immigrants from all over the world flood to America to claim their own piece of the road paved with gold. F. Scott Fitzgerald knew about this American dream all to well and portrayed his opinion of it in his novel The Great Gatsby. Jay Gatsby was certain that wealth was the solution to Daisy's heart, and it was because of this misconception that led to

"The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1531 words - 6 pages incorporated the lifestyle into the characters in their novels. An example of this is the character of Nick Carraway in the novel The Great Gatsby. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby, the character of Nick is obviously a raging homosexual. Although Fitzgerald never states this directly, it can be easily interpreted through the text.First, the character of Nick Carraway can be identified as a closet homosexual through his way with

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1603 words - 7 pages intrigued with it. I loved that F. Scott Fitzgerald, wrote it so that the readers would never know what Gatsby, Daisy and Tom were thinking; which always had me wondering. I hated that, throughout the whole thing, Nick and Jordan both knew what was happening to everyone, but neither of them tried to prevent anything. From the beginning, Nick said, his father told him not to get in other people’s business but they could have saved lives! If Nick

"The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1101 words - 4 pages The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldFitzgerald's use of symbolismWhat are some symbols used in The Great Gatsby?How does Fitzgerald use color?Examples of color use in The Great GatsbyCritical Analysis of The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, centers on the wealthier class, and focuses on the theme of a deteriorating society. The theme can be seen in the relationships between the characters and also in the

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

10870 words - 43 pages The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald Many of these events from Fitzgerald's early life appear in his most famous novel, The Great Gatsby, published in 1925. Like Fitzgerald, Nick Carraway is a thoughtful young man from Minnesota, educated at an Ivy League school (in Nick's case, Yale), who moves to New York after the war. Also similar to Fitzgerald is Jay Gatsby, a sensitive young man who idolizes wealth and luxury and who falls in

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1590 words - 7 pages A tale of love, mystery, betrayal, and revenge can be best used to describe one of the most intriguing books ever written “The Great Gatsby” Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Legacy of Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald all began on September 24th when he was born in St. Paul Minnesota. His first piece of literature came when he was just 13 writing a detective story for his school newspaper. His father noticed he had an immense amount of talent

"The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1020 words - 4 pages ...[and] once killed a man who had found out he was nephew to von Hindenburg and second cousin to the devil." (65) Of course these stories were not true, yet Gatsby encouraged these lies by telling ones of his own. As a result, in order for others to see one's true self, they must see it first themselves. The Great Gatsby was a book full of messages, which F. Scott Fitzgerald hoped the reader would gain knowledge of. One of the more essential

Similar Essays

Nick Carraway's Epiphany In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

2880 words - 12 pages Nick’s Epiphany in The Great Gatsby A soft breeze lifts off the Sound and brushes Nick Carraway’s face as he emerges from the shadows into the moonlight. His eyes first gaze across the bay to the house of Tom and Daisy where Nick sees past the walls to people who “...smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together...” (Fitzgerald: 187- 188). Nick’s

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby Nick Carraway's Self Interest

1781 words - 7 pages Nick's Self-Interest in The Great Gatsby      In his novel The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald portrays a world filled with rich societal happenings and love affairs. His main character, Gatsby, is flamboyant, pompous, and only cares about impressing the love of his life, Daisy Buchanan. Nick is Fitzgerald's narrator for the story, and is a curious choice as a narrator because he is of a different class and almost a different world

How And Why Does F. Scott Fitzgerald Use Nick Carraway As His Narrator Of "The Great Gatsby"?

1954 words - 8 pages , our opinions are based on his. Carraway is a man who observes; this helps us see the story in as much detail as needed, without any important sections forgotten about. And perhaps, Fitzgerald is trying to make sense of his own life, which is similar to that of Gatsby, and uses an outside perspective, that of Nick Carraway, to analyse and foresee what is to come for himself."The Great Gatsby" - F. Scott Fitzgerald (Penguin Classics)

Consequences Of Nick Carraway As Narrator Of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

1441 words - 6 pages The Importance of Nick Carraway as Narrator of The Great Gatsby   In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald critiques the disillusionment of the American Dream by contrasting the corruption of those who adopt a superficial lifestyle with the honesty of Nick Carraway. As Carraway familiarizes himself with the lives of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker and Jay Gatsby, he realizes the false seductiveness of the New York lifestyle and regains respect