Factories And Slums In Victorian England

1445 words - 6 pages

As the old agriculture system declined it gave birth to a new era known as the Industrial Revolution. This change led to the growth of factories and production of textiles. Even though people could argue that factories and slums were not terrible, during the Victorian England period, both those places had harsh and unsanitary conditions because the people who lived in the slums had an uninhabitable environment and factories had cruel and harsh surroundings.
During the Victorian England period people were slowly changing their ways of life. People were slowly adjusting from agriculture to industry. Although it benefitted mostly the middle class and higher, it devastated the working class. In the eighteenth century, factory workers had unequal rights. Men and women were forced to work from twelve to fifteen hours every single day. With this schedule, the workers were unable to get fully rested for the next day and continued to decrease their health. According to James, of Primary Facts, said, “In cotton mills, dust from the yarn covered the workers and got in their throats. In order to make sure that the cotton was kept strong, factory owners kept their mills warm and damp. This meant that the workers often suffered with lung and chest infections.” Not only did it tire them out to the point of exhaustion, but it also increased their potential for infections. From his quote, it showed how the owners did not care for their employees’ health and can replace them in no time. Workers were expected to work quickly and delicately, but if they failed to do so some sort of consequence will happen to them. As time passed by, factories continued to prosper, the number of goods increased. This led to advancement of technology and made their machines more intricate. Although it was good our civilization was advancing, it made it harder for the workers to catch up since the speed of the machine determined the worker’s pace. Since there were no safety regulations back then most of the workers suffered injuries such as losing a finger which to the point where it could never be reversed to the way it was before (Mitchell, 56-57). When it was already that bad for the adults in the factories, it was even worst for their children. Most children had to work to help aid their parents’ family. With the lower class being close to living in poverty, most men resorted to even selling out their own wife and children. Trevelyan reports that “The men were in little better case. Often out of employment, they were forced to sell their wives and children into the slavery of the mills, while they themselves degenerated in squalid idleness,” during that time period men resorted to forcing their wife or children to work (Trevelyan 108). It shows how desperate they were to keep surviving and how they tried to keep everybody alive. Factories favored children because of their small body and hands which were able to fit in some places where adults cannot. This in turn led to abusing...

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