This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Fear In H. G. Wells' "The Red Room" And The "Red Room Episode" In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

546 words - 2 pages

Both H. G. Wells and Charlotte Bronte draw upon the Gothic tradition to create an atmosphere of fear in their books, but this is handled in different ways although with some similarities. The Gothic tradition was believed to have started in 1764, however these novels were written outside the Gothic period, with Charlotte Bronte publishing her book in 1847, and H. G. Wells publishing his in 1896, over one hundred years later than the first Gothic novel.
H. G. Wells starts off his book with a conversation between the narrator who will then go on to ender the read room, and a group of pensioners who give him several warnings that he should not enter the red room due to its haunted nature. This conversation creates a sense of fear and tension as the reader is informed that the room the narrator is about to enter is indeed haunted and, due to the Gothic status of this book, the events which are soon to happen inside the red room are going to be daunting. Wells creates an atmosphere of fear by the description of the physical aspects of the room but also the shear darkness of the large area.
"And looking around that large sombre room, with its shadowy window bays, its recesses and alcoves, one could well understand the legends that had sprouted in its black corners, its germinating darkness."
The narrator is unaware of the surroundings in the room, which makes him nervous and fearful. This suggests a link between fear and darkness. The narrator lights a candle and wanders around the room, attempting to extinguish the darkness present in the room.
"The shadow in the alcove at the...

Find Another Essay On Fear in H. G. Wells' "The Red Room" and the "Red-room Episode" in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

The Creation of Fear and Suspense in 'The Red Room' by HG Wells

3216 words - 13 pages The Creation of Fear and Suspense in 'The Red Room' by HG Wells HG Wells conveys the experiences in the red room in many ways throughout the story. He is an English author and a political philosopher, most famous for his science fiction romances that variously depict alien invasion, terrifying future societies and transformed states of being. The story of the red room is written in first person, which suggests that the

Exploring how HG Wells created an atmosphere of fear and tension in 'The red room'

1771 words - 7 pages How does HG Wells build up an atmosphere of fear and show the young man reduced from self-assurance to panic and terror?The title of the story I will look at in this assignment is “The Red Room” by HG Wells. It is a ghost story, written in 1896. HG Wells uses elements from the gothic genre to enhance the sinister atmosphere in the story. “The Red Room” is written in first person, this enables the reader to experience the

Tension and suspense in "The Red Room" - H.G Wells

1095 words - 4 pages The Red RoomSetting and historical influence -The author starts the story in an eerie room lit by the fireplace in which 3 withered custodians are gathered around. - This gives the impression that the room is quite cold.The fact it is set in a big mansion, back in the nineteenth century, that is owned by 3 old custodians, already adds mystery as he makes them out to be very grotesque.The house is very old and derelict, not homey at allIt has

Analyse the passage from Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" in which Jane finds herself locked within the Red Room at Gateshead Hall, explaining its relevance to the structure of the novel as a whole

1839 words - 7 pages Throughout the course of this essay I will be examining an extract from the second chapter of Charlotte Bront¸'s 'Jane Eyre' in which Jane finds herself locked in the Red Room. I will be looking closely at the relevance of this passage to the structure of the novel overall, paying close attention to the narrative devices used.The novel is a fictional autobiography comprising a first-person narrative, which allows the reader to see events

Suspense In The Red Room

1536 words - 6 pages The Red Room’ written by a famous writer H.G Wells. He was a science fiction writer who lived in the Victorian times. People in the Victorian times believed in science and also believed everything they were told. I will be explaining genre, the structure, setting, language, imagery and atmosphere in order to create suspense. The Red Room is based on a gothic horror story. This type of fiction existed in the late 18th and 19th centaury, gothic

The Red Room by H.G. Wells

2376 words - 10 pages , because of the ?spiral staircase?, and the ?door covered with baize?, this gives the reader the impression that the Red Room is very far away from the elderly people. This may be because they are too scared to go anywhere the room, because they see something frightening. ?The spiral staircase? makes the reader think that it may go on forever. This setting is typical of a 19th century story. This also gives H. G. Wells the opportunity to develop

The Red Room by H.G. Wells

4124 words - 16 pages The Red Room by H.G. Wells During the Victorian period, readers became engrossed with gothic horror and psychologically thrilling literature. Subsequently making these genres to be among one of the most read story lines; it has remained a popular genre since. H. G. Wells wrote science-fiction novels such as 'The first men in the moon', but he also created 'The Red Room', written in 1894, which was based on Gothic

The red room by H.G Wells

998 words - 4 pages The Red Room is a 'spine chiller' written by H.G Wells. The story is set at Lorraine Castle where a specific room is preoccupied by ghastly spirits. This story The Red Room is about a man (narrator) who seeks spirits inside Lorraine Castle, with his only protection as his revolver. The spirit welcomes the man in an uncomfortable manner, moving furniture, candles going out without smoke and other procedures which the spirit posses. His excuse for

The Element of Fear: Dickens´ The Signalman and Wells´ Red Room

2097 words - 8 pages Charles Dickens’ ‘The Signalman,’ and H.G Wells’ ‘Red Room’ are both short stories written to grip readers through the element of fear. Both tales were written near the end of the Victorian era, during Queen Victoria’s reign. Victorian Britain had a liking for literature, including short stories. Short stories were idyllic because they were a source of instant entertainment, the type required in technologically withdrawn times. People were also

How Tension and Suspense Is Built Up In "The Red Room" by H.G. Wells

746 words - 3 pages There are many different ways in which HG Wells builds up tension and suspense in 'The Red Room'. One way in which he does this is through the use of language. One of the main effective uses of language in 'The Red Room' is the use of personification; "made the shadows cower and quiver". The shadow embeds fear into the reader, as they wonder if the shadow is alive, which creates tension as the reader wonders what will happen next. Furthermore

H.G. Wells: ‘The Red Room’ and ‘The Cone’

1604 words - 6 pages part of the ‘Gothic’ genre and HG Wells heavily emphasises horror and mystery throughout the two stories to create a tense and suspenseful atmosphere. One way he creates this kind of atmosphere is through his physical descriptions of both the location and the characters. In ‘The Red Room’ he describes how ‘the grand staircase picked out everything in vivid black shadow or silvery illumination’; the use of ‘silvery

Similar Essays

The Language In The Red Room By H G Wells And The Signalman By Charles Dickens

911 words - 4 pages The Language in The Red Room by H G Wells and The Signalman by Charles Dickens Throughout, The Signalman has suspense and the tension is gripping, as the author, Dickens, has used exceedingly good description in the language and the setting is just perfect. Dickens had an advantage when writing this story as there were similarities between himself and some of the characters; since he had been involved in a train

The Red Room In Jane Eyre Essay

1093 words - 4 pages Hung Harris PhamEnglish 111Prof. AmsterFinal PaperThe Red-room in Jane EyreIt is not rare to encounter effective and incisive uses of space within nineteenth century literature. The famous novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is one of the finest examples of a fictional work with profuse uses of space in the period. The red-room in which the little Jane Eyre is locked as a punishment for her panicky defense of herself against her cousin John

The Signalman By Charles Dickens And The Red Room By H G Wells

2245 words - 9 pages people believe that the red room is haunted and they dare not even go there. They have become wise as they have heard the stories about the room and none of them have ever had first hand experience of the room. These characters are described in a gothic way so they appear as strange and as unusual as possible. By making them like this, H G Wells is making the atmosphere seem strange and eerie. 'His lower lip, half averted, hung pale and pink

The Sense Of Mystery And Fear In Herbert George Wells' ‘The Red Room’

1277 words - 5 pages mystery, as the reader does not know why the adjective ‘red’ is used to describe the room and this colour is usually associated with danger, blood, hell and fear, suggesting that Wells is preparing the reader for anguish. Also using alliteration in the title enhances and puts emphasis on the ‘Red Room’, as no other colour would create the same effect which captures the reader’s imagination. This links directly to the Gothic genre, drawing attention