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"Women's Rights" The Essay Explains The Way Women In The Early 20th Century Were Segregated, And What They Did To Earn There Rights They Have Today.

555 words - 2 pages

It was long ago when women were looked upon as slaves to the hard Working, man. In today's society women now are more respected and are acceptable for many jobs as men are. Yet, long before our time during World War II, women were thought many different things that they could only imagine. During the postwar, women were, then equipped with many different abilities colliding with their home chores and knowledge. Women then took their stand and many acts were passes in their favor. In this essay I shall be discussing the many different requirements women went through during World War II, their postwar abilities, and the discussion of what the men in the past had against the women of today.The war's demand, the war had made the proposition to the women to do the man's work (Leahy, pg.35). Women were encouraged to take these jobs for the first time in history. To some it was a shock but to many it was a divine privilege. By 1942 a poll showed that only 13% of Americans opposed women in the workforce (Leahy, pg.36). Many of them also became war nurses and helped many of the men recover. It would seem that women's interests in occupational equality were directly linked to the nation's state of distress. Many women were exceptionally well at making bombs and took the place of men. During the war women received many different opportunity and advancement in their lives. Even though there were many laws prohibiting women from working they still came through for our country (Walker, pg.2). For once women were looked at as producers and not...

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