Feminine Psyche In The Odyssey Essay

705 words - 3 pages

Feminine Psyche in The Odyssey

The Odyssey has much to teach us about the feminine psyche. The feminine psyche is the way that the female mind and soul react to and process situations. Females are generally faithful, giving, and respectful to their mates. We have an insight into the feminine psyche in several things that Penelope does. The weaving and unweaving of the shroud and the test of the bed are two examples of the way Penelope thinks. She does what is thought to be her duty to her husband to resist the suitors and remain faithful and loyal to her husband.

Homer reveals the feminine psyche in Penelope, a loving and faithful wife to Odysseus. She was loyal to Odysseus the entire time he was away on his journey, and even when it appeared that he would not return she still had faith that he would. Penelope resisted the advances of the suitors because she loved Odysseus and could not see herself with another when he could still be alive. She was smart and cunning when it came to resisting the suitors. Penelope shows us an insight to the feminine psyche when we learn she has avoided having to choose a new husband by telling the suitors she would choose a one of them once she finished the shroud she was weaving for Odysseus’ father. Penelope worked all day on the shroud and would unravel the weaving by candlelight at night while the suitors slept. This shows her dedication to Odysseus and that she does not want to tell the suitors no and be disrespectful to her guests. Odysseus was “”blessed in the possession of a wife endowed with such a rare excellence of understanding, and so faithful to her wedded lord”” ( ). This is a great example of the feminine psyche. She was ultimately devoted to her wedded husband and did what she had to do to remain faithful to him.

Another example of the feminine psyche in the Odyssey could be the test of the bed. When Odysseus finally returns to Ithaka and reveals himself to the Penelope...

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