This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Film Noir Essay

644 words - 3 pages

Alexandria JeterFilm Genres10/01/2014Film Noir PaperA film noir, by definition is a style or genre of cinematographic film marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, and menace. The term was originally applied (by a group of French critics) to American thriller or detective films made in the period 1944-54 and to the work of directors such as Orson Welles, Fritz Lang, and Billy Wilder. Film noir are films where evil triumphs over good and a psychological thriller in which it uses shadows, strong behavior, less lighting, sharp angles, strong language, violence, and the style of the 40s to convey a specific message of suspense and fiction. Film noirs became prevalent after World War II when dark movies started coming to the surface. Influenced by German Expressionism, film noir had the opportunities offered by the booming Hollywood film industry, and, later, the threat of growing Nazi power, led to the emigration of many important film artists working in Germany who had either been directly involved in the Expressionist movement or studied with its practitioners.What drives a noir is a crime or the aftermath of a crime. Film noir has strong angles from the camera which shows tension. The camera angles, which are at a specific angle, show that nothing is what it seems. According to the book Film Genres, "the stories of crime and deception that are prevalent in film noir gave filmmakers many opportunities to create highly stylized images that evoke the genre's peculiar twilit world. While Hollywood movies in the 1940s and 1950s often follow a standard visual style, the noir genre enabled filmmakers to push the boundaries of Hollywood style in interesting and exciting ways." It also usually has a femme fatale in which means a by definition is a stock character of a mysterious and seductive woman...

Find Another Essay On Film Noir

Film Noir: The Maltese falcon Essay

1012 words - 4 pages Film Noir was extremely trendy during the 1940’s. People were captivated by the way it expresses a mood of disillusionment and indistinctness between good and evil. Film Noir have key elements; crime, mystery, an anti-hero, femme fatale, and chiaroscuro lighting and camera angles. The Maltese Falcon is an example of film noir because of the usage of camera angles, lighting and ominous settings, as well as sinister characters as Samuel Spade, the

Film Noir: A Style Spanning Genres

1076 words - 4 pages The classification and cataloging of items seem to fulfill a basic need in human beings, whether it is vegetable, mineral or animal. It seems that this basic need to analyze and categorize items applies also to objets d’art, including film – and the recognition or dismissal of film noir as a genre has been argued since the term was coined. While the term itself is valid, film noir as a genre is a misnomer. More properly, film noir should be

Film Noir and Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard

1106 words - 4 pages Film Noir, a term coined by the French to describe a style of film characterized by dark themes, storylines, and visuals, has been influencing cinematic industries since the 1940’s. With roots in German expressionistic films and Italian postwar documentaries, film noir has made its way into American film as well, particularly identified in mob and crime pictures. However, such settings are not exclusive to American film noir. One noteworthy

Citizen Kane a film noir genre (analysis)

1851 words - 7 pages a) The genre film noir is ''a french term referring to a kind of urban American genre that sprang up after World War II. Archetypal film noir revolve around an existentially despairing universe where there is no escape from mean city streets, loneliness and death.'' (Flash-Back, A brief history of film, p.588). ''The term film noir conjures up a series of generic and fashionable traits from certain Hollywood pictures of the 1940's and 1950's

Film Noir Conventions in The Maltese Falcon

2007 words - 8 pages One of the most influential film movements in the 1940's was a genre that is known today as film noir. French film critics who noticed the trend of how dark and black films appeared coined the term "film noir." The criminal, violence or greed elements in film noir were a metaphoric symptom of society's evils, with a strong undercurrent of moral conflict. It is a style of American films that first evolved in the 1940s, became prominent in the

The Film Noir in Double Indemnity

795 words - 4 pages Film Noir was a movement born from the disillusionment of post-war Americans. The term was coined by French critics who, after not having had access to American films since before World War II, were astonished by the “darkness” of post-war Hollywood cinema. Film noir did not provide the escape previous Hollywood films offered during the Great Depression, but instead confronted the audience with its characteristic anxiety-inducing style. The

Chinatown: Above The Film Noir Genre

1600 words - 6 pages The viewer sees a private eye and beautiful client. First thought, "It’s definitely another Hollywood crime drama." On the surface, Chinatown has all the elements of a film noir: the presence of a beautiful but dangerous woman, otherwise known as the femme fatale, a gritty urban setting, compositional tension (highly contrasting light and dark colors or oblique camera angles), and themes of moral ambiguity and alienation. Chinatown, however

Maltese Falcon as a Film Noir

1867 words - 7 pages Maltese Falcon as a Film Noir Film Noir is a French word which means: dark or black film. This is very fitting as Film Noir and the Maltese falcon are stories of dark deceptive people who often cannot be trusted. Film Noir is a good example of this as the story is about a detective called Sam Spade who gets dragged into the quest for the Maltese Falcon with a compulsive liar Kasper Gutman. The Maltese Falcon is a

Memento: An Eternal Memory of Film Noir

1985 words - 8 pages Film noir as a genre began in America following the Great Depression with a visual style reminiscent of German Expressionist cinematography. It reflects the time’s general sense of pessimism, cynicism, and dark confusion. It became widely known for its psychologically expressive approach to visual composition and many definitive stylistic elements. The use of dark and white lighting, a morally ambiguous protagonist, loose plotlines, a corrupt

The Big Lebowski Raises a Glass to Classic Film Noir

1765 words - 8 pages The Big Lebowski Raises a Glass to Classic Film Noir On the surface, The Big Lebowski might look like a simple stoner comedy, but with closer inspection the film possess sharp undertones of film noir. The Coen Brothers were inspired by film noir when making their movie, The Big Lebowski. Their main inspiration came from Raymond Chandler’s, The Big Sleep, with mix-match patches of other classic film noirs. The Big Lebowski is a playful

Dames, Coppers, and Crooks: A L:ook At Film Noir

2869 words - 11 pages Dames, Coppers, and Crooks: A Look At Film Noir      Film noir is a style of black and white American films that first evolved in the 1940s, became prominent in the post-war era, and lasted in a classic “Golden Age” period until about 1960. Frank Nino, a French film critic, first coined the label film noir, which literally means black film or cinema, in 1946. Nino noticed the trend of how “dark” and black the looks and

Similar Essays

Chinatown As Film Noir Essay

853 words - 3 pages 'Chinatown' as Film Noir      Films that are classified as being in the film noir genre all share some basic characteristics. There is generally a voice-over throughout the film in order to guide the audience's perceptions. These movies also involve a crime and a detective who is trying to figure out the truth in the situation. This detective usually encounters a femme fatale who seduces him. However, the most distinctive feature of the film

Coen Brothers' Film Noir Essay

567 words - 2 pages Neo-noir is an overused adjective in modern cinema. It's used to broadly encompass any slickly produced film with an attempted gritty atmosphere and a twisting plot that traps and undoes its usually unflappable protagonists. And The Man Who Wasn't There certainly has enough of the aforementioned elements to qualify as neo-noir to modern audiences. But like with their last film O Brother, Where Art Thou, influenced by the Odyssey and Preston

Genre Study: Film Noir Essay

6838 words - 27 pages Erotic crime drama, first filmed in the 1940s, is a sub-genre of film noir and influenced films for the next four decades. Sexual desire is central to this sub-genre, with the blockage of that desire resolved within or outside of the law. 'Out of the Past' described a social crisis and constituted a critique of that crisis, while 'Angel Face' and 'Out of the Past - Against All Odds' dealt with the same issues but drifted into melodrama.This

Film Noir: The Big Sleep Essay

1069 words - 5 pages Film Noir is a genre of distinct and unique characteristics. Mostly prominent in the 40s and 50s, the genre rarely skewed from the skeletal plot to which all Film Noir pictures follow. The most famous of these films is The Big Sleep (1946) directed by Howard Hawks. This film is the go to when it comes to all the genre’s clichés. This formula for film is so well known and deeply understood that it is often a target for satire. This is what the