The New Zealand Healthcare System Essay

1825 words - 7 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed
VIEW DOCUMENT
Preview

Signature Assignment
In comparison to other developed nations, the United States spends more of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on health care expenses than any other nation. In 2009, the US spent 16% of its GDP on the health care industry. This represents nearly double the amount spent by other OECD nations (an average of 8.7%) and came in 40 percent higher than the next highest nation, France, which had an 11.2% of GDP outlays on health care expenditures. If we examine these costs at an individual level the US spent $7,538 per capita (per person) on health care. This was more than double the OECD median for expenditures which was $2,995. Again the next highest nations were considerably less than the US, with Norway and Switzerland spending less than two-thirds the amount of the US ($5,003 for Norway and $4,627 for Switzerland). Of the remaining twelve OECD nations in all but two the spending per capita was less than fifty percent of that of the US. In New Zealand the amount per capita was nearly one-third of the US at $2,683 (Squires, 2011).
The comparison of expenditures by itself demonstrates an environment where growth is occurring in what should be a non-growth oriented industry. As costs for health care rise investment and growth in other areas will continue to stagnate. A troubling parallel aspect of the health care environment is that along with rising costs there is a significant lack of coverage for millions of Americans. The US not only leads OECD nations in expenses per person but also leads the other nations in terms of citizens without basic health care coverage (Blank, 2012).
The US has a divided system of health care coverage. Based on statistics from 2008, a majority of Americans, 60 percent, received health care coverage from private insurers, with 90 percent of that total being provided by employers. The remaining 10 percent paid the full amount out of premiums without assistances. Another 24 percent of Americans were covered under programs sponsored by the federal government: 13 percent under Medicare, 10 percent under Medicate, and about 1 percent via military health care programs. This left about 15 percent of the population or 46 million residents without any coverage (The Commonwealth Fund, 2010).
Further compounding the situation is the fact that the US has an overall trend of lower health outcomes when compared to other OECD nations. Studies have found that a variety of factors contribute to lower health outcomes. These factors range from income, race and insurance status. Another challenging fact is that one the fast growing segments of the US population are individuals who are highly vulnerable to illness. These individuals are faced with very difficult medical needs that are constrained by social and other factors. Of this population racial and ethnic minorities constitute the largest percentage how have multiple chronic co-morbidities and chronic illnesses. From 2000 to 2010 the...

Find Another Essay On The New Zealand Healthcare System

New Zealand And The Impact Of Fishing

1445 words - 6 pages In the warm southwestern seas of the world, just above Australia and the Tasman Sea, lies a beautiful island country of New Zealand. Governed by the Queen herself and kept fertile and wondrous by the gods above, this sanctuary of perfect ness can only be enhanced by its superb fisheries and varied species of fish. Often pictured by many as an ideal place of the world or the favored vacation spot, for the residents of this paradise, it is...

The Resource Management Act of New Zealand

1570 words - 6 pages Natural and physical resources are of significant importance to the New Zealand economy and its people. For this reason correct resource management is important to New Zealand. The current system used for resource management in New Zealand is the Resource Management Act (Parliamentary Council Office, 2014). The purpose of this document is to promote sustainable management of resources, both natural and physical, as New Zealand’s primary...

New Zealand and the Great War

1210 words - 5 pages New Zealand’s involvement in World War I, while short, played an eminent role in the Battle of Gallipoli and in the shaping of New Zealand’s culture. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps were on the front lines of the Gallipoli Campaign. Although this battle would be won by the Ottoman Empire, many brave men fought and lost their lives for their country and their King. ANZAC Day, which is dedicated to the remembrance of these troops, is...

The United States Healthcare System

2698 words - 11 pages their pockets. As we look forward to having a better system, let us hope that all the stakeholders concerned will work together towards achieving better terms. Works Cited Atul Gwande “The New Yorker” issue of June 1, 2009. Beeuwkes, Buntin M, Haviland AM, Mc Devitt, Sood N. “Healthcare spending and preventive care in high-deductible and consumer-directed health plans”, VA, USA 17 Mar 2011. Christopher J.L. Murray, M.D, D. Phil...

The Collapse Of New Zealand Community.

977 words - 4 pages The Collapse of New Zealand SocietyThe Barney cliché "I love you, you love me" used to describe my homeland New Zealand, but over the past ten years I have witnessed an irrevocable change for the worse. Children no longer share friendship and innocence, they are corrupted by the negative, perpetual grinder New Zealand has become. The days of companionship and neighbourly compassion have crumbled into the dusts of yesterday, and...

Schooling In The Industrial Society Of Brand New Zealand

1566 words - 6 pages In order to understand schooling in New Zealand as it is, we need to remember that the education system originated in Britain and developed in a British colony in the nineteenth century and that it was based on the English national school system. We also need to understand the key influences of the industrial age on education (Hood, 2001). Some of the issues arising in the readings are the influence education has on society, how society can be...

The Role And Features Of New Zealand Federal Government

1663 words - 7 pages [Online] Available: <a href="http://www.executive.govt.nz/era/erl_over.htm">http://www.executive.govt.nz/era/erl_over.htm [2001, April 29] Palmer, G. and Palmer, M. (1997) Bridled Power: New Zealand Government Under MMP. Chapter one: The Changing System of New Zealand Government. Auckland: Oxford University Press. TV3 (March 2000) 3 News, Television 3 and 4 Network Services Ltd. TVNZ (March 2000). One News. Television New Zealand Ltd. ...

The Role Of Technology In Changing The New Zealand Economy

2147 words - 9 pages I have also attached the paper in a word document due to formatting and graph issuesExecutive SummaryThis overview paper proposes an integrated approach for innovation policy, focusing on the particular role of technology, to support the Government's economic goals. It includes a review of the role of technology in the New Zealand...

The New Zealand Teachers Council Code Of Ethics

1494 words - 6 pages To represent my personal philosophy of teaching and learning I have sought inspiration from Maori beliefs and the native forests of New Zealand, in particular the unfurling of the koru and the symbolism that it represents and the guardianship of Tane Mahuta. For me the use of this context provides an authentic, relatable framework upon which to build my personal teaching and learning metaphor. The koru is an iconic New Zealand emblem; with...

Overview Of The 1982 Official Ideas Act In New Zealand.

1378 words - 6 pages The Official Information Act 1982The stated aim of the Official Information Act 1982:To increase progressively the availability of official information to the people of New Zealand in order--To enable their more effective participation in the making and administration of laws and policies; andTo promote...

Interview Report: Leadership In The Healthcare System

2469 words - 10 pages report concludes with a comparison and discussion of the results of the clinical condition on the basis of the interview and literature review. At the same time, the report aims to put forward feasible and effective advice and specific programs for present and future leaders and managers in the health care system. Methodology 1. The respondent’s traits and characteristics This is a nearly 40-minute interview. The object of this interview...

Other The New Zealand Healthcare System Essays

The New Healthcare System Essay

2132 words - 9 pages be handed out to the public, however the plan is already in motion and cannot be stopped, although most have considered the good and the bad, most have found it unappealing. Many people are asking the question: is Obamacare the new health care system our country deserves or is it going to lead Americans into another economic downfall? For year’s government officials have been striving for better-cheaper healthcare and president Obama...

Affordable Care Act: The New Healthcare System

1358 words - 5 pages We all know that the Affordable Care Act is going to tremendously change the United States healthcare system for the next coming decades, because more coverage will be provided to the women, men, old, and young of our nation, and to the many businesses all over this country. This new health care reform act will change the landscape of health care coverage by implementing that individuals, families, and business owners (mainly small) will be...

The Geography Of New Zealand Essay

1064 words - 4 pages Zealand than people.      The official language of New Zealand is English, although a small percentage of the people speak Maori, the native language. Somewhat corresponding to the language groups, the religious make up is 52 percent Christian, 15 percent Roman Catholic, and 33 percent unspecified or none. The country takes pride in a 99.9 percent literacy rate by having an excellent education system. The entire...

The New Zealand Defence Forces Strategic Direction

2276 words - 9 pages The New Zealand national security system has traditionally relied on a network of experienced practitioners who have, over time, developed good habits of cooperation and collaboration. New Zealand’s strategic focus now retains the best of a long-standing system while pointing the way forward to strengthen that system and position it to confront a more challenging range of demands and expectations. New Zealander’s expect a system which is able...