Fitzgerald's Use Of Language In The Great Gatsby

811 words - 3 pages

In the novel The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses tone, diction, syntax and imagery to voice Nick's perception of the world around him. In this passage his use of language is used repetitively to convey Jordan Baker, Daisy and Tom Buchanan's lives. On the outside it may look like they all are living a perfect and ideal life, however Fitzgerald's illuminating use of language highlights how far from perfect their lives truly are.
When he first walks in Nick judges Tom and Daisy's lives based on the appearance of the house, perfect and romanticized, yet he soon learns that this first impression is an overstatement. Nick's use of diction such as 'fragilely bound' (12) and 'French windows' (12) connote that their lives may look perfect on the outside but in reality they're brittle on the inside, since the words fragile and French suggest that their lives are breakable. His choice of diction also suggests an impersonal feel to the house, as if the people inside it are living a bland and dull life. As Nick walks farther in he compares the 'frosted wedding cake of the ceiling' to the 'wine- colored rug' implying both Purity and corruption. He views the cake-ceiling as pure since wedding cakes denote the meaning of innocence and purity but compares the innocence with wine which suggests corruption and impurity. Again, this comparison shows that Tom and Daisy's lives look pure as cake, however in reality their life is as corrupted as wine.
Upon meeting Daisy and Jordan, Nick perceives them as if they are ?buoyed up as though upon an anchored balloon.? (12) Suggesting that something is weighing them both down but they both want to be free from their oppressions of their societies-they want to be carefree. Nick?s choice of diction like ?boom, Tom Buchanan shut the rear windows and the caught wind died out?and the two young women ballooned slowly to the floor,? (12) shows Tom?s authority and the how gender roles affected everyone back in the 1920?s. Tom?s overpowering demeanor hides his actual self, he has a strong aura around him which suggests his authority on everyone around him, making him a kill joy. ¬
A very important motif in this passage is the color white. Nick states white in two different meanings, at the beginning of the passage ?white? is used to reflect elegance and purity but as Nick spends more time the ?white? in the house he learns that the color...

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