Florida Water Shortage Essay

734 words - 3 pages

Water Shortage PAGE 1
Florida Water ShortageTracey WilliamsUniversity of PhoenixPeople, Science and the EnvironmentSCI/256Gail SadlerJanuary 25, 2005Florida Water ShortageFears of water shortage are growing in Florida as a soaring population strains a once-abundant resource. Many challenges lie ahead as people try to save an environment and an economy dependent on water. The water shortage problem affects us all in one way or another. Either through the mandatory restrictions or the increased price of water, or even the ever increasing occurrence of sinkholes, the evidence of water shortage is everywhere. Since we need water to survive, and there are no alternatives to support life on this planet, we must find a way to keep up with our expanding water demand. The problem can worsen as the ground becomes saturated and septic tanks begin to fail. Add to that the extraordinary measures water management officials must employ to keep flood waters under control. The district has opened old canals that usually are closed, dumping storm water directly into the Indian River Lagoon. The damage that may cause to the lagoon's delicate ecosystem is hard to calculate.We use water every day and in many ways. We use water to take a shower, brush our teeth, water our lawns, wash our laundry and cars or just simply to support our very existence. Clearly we cannot do without water, and there simply is not enough to go around. One alternative is to recycle the water. We already treat out waste water with processes that result in a water 99.5% pure. If this water was to be sent to a water treatment plant to be processed along with the water already being processed, there would be plenty of water available. This water could be used as clean water, for drinking or cooking, or for laundry or irrigation.Desalted seawater will pour into thousands of drinking cups in the Tampa area by next year. And with those first sips, Florida will harness a new water source that will help clear the way for future decades of growth building booms that might otherwise be stifled by water scarcity. Making oceans and other surface waters drinkable are responses to the relentless strain that population...

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