Food Production In Relation To Climate Change

1320 words - 5 pages

Climate change is currently one of the greatest challenges facing our species. This case study report will examine issues related to food production in relation to climate change. In this regard, the focus will be on the Peace River Country, which is a parkland region that spans from northwestern Alberta to the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia and around the Peace River. As part of its examination, this report will explore the local environment conditions, and offer predictions of what lies ahead in areas of economic development, the food practices including how climate changes may affect the local food production, as well as other future and predicted changes in the area.
Environment conditions in the area:
Peace River Country has a continental climate with a low precipitation rate that reduces the local humidity and causes the hot summer and a cold winter feeling (Churcher & Wilson, 1979, p.71). Moreover, it has a series of pollutions like notably air and water pollutions that are affected by pollutant-inducing resources in the province of Alberta. There is an abundance of petroleum and gas resources in Alberta. On the one hand, these valuable resources promote and supports the local economy and the country`s GDP; on the other hand, it damages the surrounding environment. Because the major resources in Alberta are gas and petroleum, and these kind of resources are non-renewable, and the result translates into bad air and water quality in the local region. Also, as one of the more populous provinces in Canada, Alberta maintains numerous industries and develops lots of tar sand, which is a kind of bituminous sand that is formed from oil. This toxic waste of oil sand creates more greenhouse gas emissions, essentially speeding up global warming. These processes can play havoc on a community’s environment; such as the air and water quality in the Peace River region is rapidly declining. Furthermore, the water in the Peace region is scarce because it is the headwaters` collection area for all water flowing north to the arctic. During the process of the development of oil and gas, large amounts of groundwater potentially explode. In the final analysis, there is only a little groundwater or a couple of rivers that can provide regional water supply (PRRD, 2012).
Economic Development:
The economy in Peace River Country is quite developed due to its favorable landform and location. It is comprised mainly of agriculture, fishery, mining, petroleum exploration and development, and as well, forestry plays a large role in the Peace Country. There is a Peace River Pulp mill which is located in the Boreal Forest region, and that region produces lots of Aspen hardwood and Spruce softwood species that are useful in the pulp furnish (Invest, 2014). Vast resources in the area can increase the utilization of wood products and promote the local economy. Moreover, the Peace River region has a robust agricultural development in grain, oil seed...

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