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Foreshadowing In A Tale Of Two Cities

735 words - 3 pages

Foreshadowing in A Tale of Two Cities

 

How does diabolically spilt blood and mysterious footsteps become important in a historical fiction novel? What makes these murder-mystery traits relevant? Charles Dickens, author of A Tale of Two Cities, creatively foreshadows future events using suspenseful topics: A forbidden declaration of love, a tragically beautiful sunset streaked with crimson, echoing footsteps of a past that will not be forgotten, and wine stained streets soon to be smeared with blood. The aforementioned events are pulled together in this story of love and sacrifice. Collectively, they are an example of successful use of foreshadowing to create an atmosphere of foreboding and intrigue.

 

Dickens dedicated many of his long-winded paragraphs to the scene where the Defarge's wine was spilt. He describes in detail how eager and needy the French peasants were... drinking wine from muddy streets, feeding the drink to the youngest and oldest of their ranks. Such a scene may seem unimportant, but, since it was thoroughly described, Dickens must of had a specific purpose for it. The wine cask that was broken in the streets prophesized that blood would soon be spilt, and the thirst the peasants had for the wine foretold their savage thirst for blood.

 

A great corner for echoing was located near where Lucie and her father lived. Lucie, in fanciful times of imagination, made predictions about the echoing footsteps she heard pass by. During a night of conversation with Darnay and Carton, Lucie stated, "I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by-and-by into our lives." (pg.121;book2;ch.6) And, although the innocent character Lucie may not realize it, Dickens, her creator, has her say such words to foretell the times when the footsteps of the past will again catch up with the book's characters. The mention of these echoes makes the reader wonder (along with the musing threesome) who will...

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