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Forms Of Violence In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

2206 words - 9 pages

Forms of Violence in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
Works Cited Missing

Toni Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye is about the life of a black low
class family, who resides in America in the late 1930s. Everyday they
are confronted to the problem of violence. And we would see that this
violence is present inside their own family as well as in all the
community around them. Then we will explain that all this abuse comes
for the most part from racism and the idealized concept of white
beauty. In addition, with regard to racism, we will see that this
oppressed black society suffers on the one hand from racism from white
people and on the other hand from their own race. In addition, we will
demonstrate that violence is expressed by different forms throughout
the novel, namely physical, verbal and emotional.

Firstly, the most important representation of violence in The Bluest
Eye is the one in Breedlove's family. The daughter Pecola is an
innocent little girl nevertheless, she is the principal victim of this
abuse. It is bad enough that practically the whole world rejects her,
but even in her own family she cannot find any kind of consolation.
Indeed Pecola's family life is brutal. Her father, who is very often
drunk, hits her mother. Consequently, these ritual and terrible
fights, which is here physical violence, create a terrorific mental
violence to Pecola. It can be seen in the passage where she prays God
to make her disappear during one of her parents' fight "Please
God…Please make me disappear"1 (p.45). This desire of vanishing
demonstrate very well the state of her spirit that is to say she is
desperating and for her, life has no value anymore. Indeed, she is the
witness of the destruction of her family. Moreover, this psychological
violence does not stop here, it goes further. Indeed it reaches the
most unbelievable and violent point of this novel, namely the rape
from Pecola's father; he not only rapes her but also impregnates her
having sexual intercouse a second time. This unimaginable and cruel
scene relieves from a total lack of humanity, indeed he leaves her
slightly unconscious and lying on the kitchen. In addition to this
unhuman act, comes the pysycological consequences for Pecola, namely
the rejection and ignorance of her mother, who does not believe what
she says. This ignorance, from which Pecola suffers, spreads in all
the novel with the rejection of other people who ignore her. It will
be one of the reasons, which will lead her to psychological
destruction at the end of the novel.

1 Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. United States of America: Plume,
1994.

As far as this form of violence is concerned, it is important to note
down that Toni Morrison does not completely condemn the actions of
Pecola's parents. Indeed, she has previously described their
...

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