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Founding Fathers And Voting Rights Essay

819 words - 4 pages

The Founding Fathers wanted the people to be free and vote for the person they want to be the president and be the leader of the United States for a period of time. They wanted outsiders to feel welcomed and not feel like a slave like some people are in other countries. The Founding Fathers wanted to make us a free country and have our own rights and a choice to decide for themselves and not be told who to vote for but they also can decide not to vote for anyone if they like. They made amendments to help keep the voting rights the same and let everyone vote and not be turned away for their race or gender or anything that's different about he/she. Some of the founding fathers thought that religion had something to do with voting but they had their disagreements and though they still made the constitution that helps voters and help people gain their voting rights.

You have to be 18 years of age to vote and I agree with the law on this because first you have to know what to do and what not to do when you have you choose who you want as the new president. So younger kids would make mindless mistakes and then they would regret what they have done or who they have chosen. But the bright side of all that is that you don’t have to choose a side if you don’t want to and you can’t be forced to choose one because that also is against the law. Though you can choose a side and also choose the person who agrees with what you believe in. There are two sides you can choose and that are the Republican Party and the Democratic Party.

I think the voting rights is fair because it has had its adjustments to where it is equal and fair to everyone in the U.S. Schools should let the kids know at an early age about the doubts of voting. So even though we can’t vote for the real president at the age of minorities they can still get a good view of what it’s about in school. It allows help to all the kids that can’t legally vote for the president yet but it shows them what to do and what not to do so they know what to do when they do get of age...

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