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Frankenstein Analysis

793 words - 4 pages

How can such disparate characters, that are even resentful towards one another, be so consubstantial? Though Victor and the monster do not share the same physical or social traits, they have many of the same personality traits. Victor and the monster are analogous with their desire for knowledge, relationships with nature, and with desires for family. The author uses complex diction, symbolism, and syntax to emphasize these similarities. Throughout the plot, these similarities become more apparent and as this occurs their relationship worsens.
Victor and the monster both crave knowledge. Walton recalls Victor stating, “You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been.” (Letter 4) This is important because this desire to learn drives most of their actions and the decisions they make. We can see examples of this in the text for both Victor and the monster. For example, Victor read lots of literature on the natural sciences, and then went to a university to further his knowledge of the field. (pg. 45) As for the monster, we can see that he was driven to learn French so he would be able to communicate with others. The monster is also very well spoken; he says, “I was not even of the same nature as man. I was more agile than they and could subsist upon coarser diet; I bore the extremes of heat and cold with less injury to my frame; my stature far exceeded theirs.” (ch.13) The diction the author uses to portray the monster also contributes to his apparent intelligence. Throughout the novel, both characters become particularly knowledgeable about the world around them.
Victor and the monster are also similar in their relationships with nature. Walton explains that Victor, “Even broken in spirit as he is, no one can feel more deeply than he does the beauties of nature. The starry sky, the sea, and every sight afforded by these wonderful regions, seems still to have the power of elevating his soul from earth” (pg. 27). Victor and the monster both share a love for spring because it is a time of renewal. The nature around them is symbolic of their emotions and mental states. For example, the weather turned stormy when Victor’s mood worsened (ch. 10). Victor also feels that nature, “gives wings to the...

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