Frankenstein And The Monster Description Essay

630 words - 3 pages


In “Frankenstein,” Mary Shelley captures various similar characteristic between Victor Frankenstein and his monster. He and his creation are very alike in personality. They shared an eagerness to learn, and a thirst for revenge. They also showed a sense of gratefulness for nature. Even in their most depressing moods, the ways of nature always seemed to calm them. In the deaths of William and Justine, Victor found peace staring upon the glaciers of Montanvert, it “filled [him] with a sublime ecstasy that gave wings to the soul, and allowed it to soar from the obscure world to light and joy.” Like Victor, nature seemed to calm the monster. After he is disclaimed Felix, Agatha, and De Lacey, he felt demoralized, but was appeased when “the pleasant sunshine, and the pure air of day, restored [him] to some degree of tranquility…”
Victor Frankenstein was a very ambitious and determined man, which, ultimately, led to his demise. Even as a child, Frankenstein’s “temperature [was] turned, not towards childish pursuits, but to an eager desire to learn.” When he was merely a teen, he came across a series of Cornelius Agrippa’s novels, an elder alchemist. He became very enthralled with the idea of bringing life from death after his mother dies. Frankenstein’s thirst for knowledge led him to venture on to be a student at the University of Ingolstadt to major in science. There, Victor learned and mastered natural philosophy. His professor, Dr. Waldman, played a major role in Frankenstein’s philosophy. Dr. Waldman introduced Victor to the idea of using electricity to regenerate tissue. Those ideas become Frankenstein’s life for the time to follow. As the story progresses on, Frankenstein’s hard work starts to become meaningful. After discovering “the gift of life,” he assembles a monster and brings him to life. The monster stood 8ft tall, but withheld the brain of an infant. He, like...

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