Franz Fanon, Utopia, And The Communist Manifesto

1190 words - 5 pages

What if we all Worked Together? The struggles that continue to arise in society are due to the increasing difference between the poorest and richest members of societies. The works written by Fanon as well as Engels and Marx, in addition to "Utopia" by Thomas More, clearly demonstrate the advantages of a society which don't suffer from this disparity. All authors argue that when all a society's members have role's and work together; a more gratifying, productive society is created. An ideal society is one which has no separation between the rich and the poor; the have's and the have-nots, where a society is united as a whole and a class-system doesn't exist. Thomas More, the author of "Utopia" talks about one of the biggest societal problems, private ownership of land (which doesn't exist in Utopia, when he states, "they are generally set on acquiring new kingdoms, right or wrong, than on governing well those they possess" (5). In another famous work entitled, "The Communist Manifesto" Marx explains a formula, almost scientific, for how humanity would best exist based upon his observations and attempted an explanation through his literary work. More is absolutely correct in stating, "As long as there is property, and while money is the standard of all things, I cannot think that a nation can be governed either justly or happily; not justly, because the best things will fall to the share of the worst men" (24). Marx is most famous for writing about the rationale of how the rich will continue to get richer and that they lack strength in number, because in every society the rich make up a minority of the population, yet posses a majority of the wealth. When referring to the bourgeoisie early on in "The Manifesto", Marx writes, "It has agglomerated population, centralized means of production and has a concentrated property in a few hands" (13). Fanon, in his novel talks much more through his experience than Marx does. Marx more or less does a scientific observation of all humankind and how it will work (which in many ways is very accurate). The politically-savvy book written by Fanon talks much more of direct experience justifies this rationale to the reader. Trying to explain to the reader with just a bit of the desperation states, "…I have to tell you I've seen peasants dry the tears of their wives who had been raped under their very eyes" (189). Fanon did quite extensive studies of psychology, mental disorders in particular, which clearly is shown in his novel. Fanon goes on a little later in the book and writes, "There are some French among us… They're disguised as Arabs… They've all got to be killed… Give me a machine gun. All these so-called Algerians are French… and they won't leave me alone…but I'll fight back. I'll kill them all, every one of them. I'll slit their throats, one after the other, and yours as well… the children, the dogs, the birds, the donkeys… nobody will...

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