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Frederick Douglass And The Abolition Of Slavery

748 words - 3 pages

Frederick Douglass and the Abolition of Slavery

There were many influential people who fought for the abolition of slavery in the 1800s. Among these people are Harriet Tubman, William Lloyd Garrison, and our sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln. Frederick Douglass is one of these people. As a former slave, Frederick Douglass believed he could not enjoy his freedom while the rest of his people suffered under the burden of slavery. Therefore, he spent much of his adult life working to abolish slavery. Frederick Douglass was a notable figure in the abolitionist movements in the 1800s and is still honored today.

The first reason why Frederick Douglass was a prominent abolitionist was because of his experiences in his life. He was born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey in 1817 in Tuckahoe, Maryland (“Douglass, Frederick”). He was born as a slave and was raised by his grandmother because his mother was sold when he was an infant, as was a common occurrence in the American South (“Frederick Douglass”). When he was old enough, Douglass was put to work by Edward Lloyd. This is when he experienced the hardships of slavery (“Frederick Douglass”). In 1825, he was transferred to the household of Hugh Auld (“Frederick Douglass”). He learned to read and write from Auld’s wife (“Frederick Douglass”). When Auld found out that his wife was educating Douglass, he put a stop to it. However, Douglass continued to read and write secretly (“Frederick Douglass”). In 1838, Douglass managed to escape to freedom in New York (“Frederick Douglass”). However, he was forced to move to Great Britain in 1845 because of Fugitive Slave laws (“Frederick Douglass”). He returned in 1847 (“Frederick Douglass”). He received enough money in Britain to publish the North Star, a weekly anti-slavery newspaper (“Frederick Douglass”). Frederick Douglass’s life experiences gave him a better understanding of slavery and a slave’s life. his knowledge allowed him to be a powerful journalist and orator. (Add more.)

Frederick Douglass’s impact on the country as an orator, autobiographer, and journalist is another reason he was significant. Douglass delivered his first public address in 1841 and was offered the position of a lecturer for the “Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society” by William Lloyd Garrison and other abolitionists (“Frederick Douglass”). He worked for the society for 4 successful years...

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