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Freedom Of The City: Justice Essay

530 words - 3 pages

In the Freedom of the City, Friel shows that justice is impossible to achieve because of political prejudice. This prejudice is obvious in each of the Judge speeches as his comments show that he has already made a decision in reference to the events of the Guildhall. This bias is also shown throughout the play, as he guides the witnesses statements so that they coincide with his own personal beliefs of what exactly happened in London Derry in 1970.In his first speech, the author Brian Friel introduces the character of the Judge as a man who has already made a decision in reference to the events of the Guildhall after an illegal protest march for civil rights was organised ...view middle of the document...

The second that it was a misguided, unplanned scheme, but it seems that both of these conclusions suggest the three who entered the Guildhall were guilty.The Judge does not hide his bias in the reader, second encounter with him as he makes the brigadier aware that he was an army man. Although this does not have an effect on the brigadiers statement it makes the reader aware of the beliefs that he holds. He then guides the statements made by those witnesses so that they coincide with his beliefs concerning the events of that day. The Judge refers to the acts of the army as an attempt to teach the ghettos a lesson. This language used by the Judge to make the Brigadier aware of his beliefs.The Judge questions the motives and statements of those witnesses in which argue against the beliefs that he held concerning the events questioned. An example of this is when he refers to father Bronson's statement as the truth s he knew It.?This use of language is used to steer the proceedings and belittle Father Bronson statement.In the final encounter with the Judge at the conclusion of the play, the reader is issued with the findings of the inquiry. The judge concludes that the deaths of the three would have not taken place if not for the illegal protest march, and clears the army. The reader then learns that the judge has completely ignored all evidence of witness?statements if they did not fit in with his beliefs concerning the events on 1970 including the medical conclusions of Cuppley who counted 35 wounds on each body of the victims.

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