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Freud And Mead´S Theories Essay

707 words - 3 pages

Freud’s Element of Personality
Freud started out as a trained physician. He gradually branched out and began studying human personality and mental disorders. Eventually, Freud developed the theory of psychoanalysis. “Freud claimed that biology plays a major part in human development, although not in terms of specific instincts, as is the case in other species”(pg.104).
In his theory, he believed that humans are born with two basic needs. The first he called Eros, the Greek god of love, which is the need for an emotional or sexual bonding. The second need Freud called Thanatos, the Greek word for death, which is the desire to be aggressive. “ Freud combined basic needs and the influence of society into model of personality with three parts: id, ego, superego”(pg. 104).
Humans have an unconscious demand for satisfaction. Freud calls this need “id”, the Latin word for “it”. The id is the one component that a human has at birth. It is the part of the personality structure that is unorganized, which contains human's basic, instinctual drives. The id is where our needs wants, impulses, sexual, and aggressive desires come from. If people were only guided by the id, people would not be able to cope in reality.
The ego was developed in order acts as a mediator between the id and reality. Initially the ego is “that part of the id which has been modified by the direct influence of the external world” (Freud 1923). The ego operates to satisfy the demands of the id, while avoiding the consequences of the external world. The ego considers societies norms and etiquettes when deciding how to behave. The ego is "like a man on horseback, who has to hold in check the superior strength of the horse"(Freud, 1923, p.15). The ego is the part of the personality structure that is rational, and oriented in to problem solving.
The superego develops in a child that has matured and their parents have instilled morals in them. Generally, the superego develops in children between the ages of 3 – 5 during the phallic stage of psychosexual...

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