From Harmony To Havoc In Macbeth

622 words - 2 pages

Chaos is present where there are conflicting forces. In Act II of Macbeth, it certainly is existent, especially after the killing of Duncan. In the beginning of the play, Macbeth is a distinguished nobleman, who has a good reputation as a captain. He is loyal, courageous, and well respected by others, including the king. However, from the moment Macbeth hears the witches’ prophecies, disarray becomes progressively noticeable in Macbeth’s disposition, between the characters, in nature, and in the human world.
By murdering the king, Macbeth’s state of mind plummets. He experiences hallucinations, which can be seen as products of his paranoia. On the night of Duncan’s death, Macbeth sights a floating dagger before him. Questioning his judgment, Macbeth asks, “Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle toward my hand?” (II, i, 33-34). It reveals Macbeth’s swaying resolve to go through with the plan to kill Duncan. He also tells the “sure and firm-set earth” to “hear not [his] steps” out of fear that the stones would tell the world what he is about to do. Moments after Duncan dies, Macbeth’s imagination takes a further step, and he thinks he hears “a voice cry “Sleep no more!”” (II, ii, 34). Macbeth is afraid that because he killed the king in his sleep, the same will happen to him, hence the voices he hears. His troubled mind drives him to kill the king’s two guards, shedding more blood than is intended.
Unbalance is not only brewing within Macbeth, but among others around him. Before the banquet at Inverness, Banquo has a sense of foreboding, agreeing to speak with and support Macbeth as long as he can “keep [his] bosom franchised and allegiance clear” (II, ii, 27-28). He already seems to suspect Macbeth. The stability in the hierarchy of Scotland is disintegrated when Macbeth...

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