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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment Essay

2062 words - 8 pages

1. As Rodya analyzes Luzhin’s character, he realizes that intellect unrestrained by moral purpose is dangerous due to the fact that many shrewd people can look right through that false façade. Luzhin’s false façade of intellect does not fool Rodya or Razumikhin, and although they try to convince Dunya into not marrying Luzhin, she does not listen. Rodya believes that Luzhin’s “moral purpose” is to “marry an honest girl…who has experienced hardship” (36). The only way he is able to get Dunya to agree to marry him, is by acting as if he is a very intellectual person, who is actually not as educated as he says he is. This illustrates the fact that Rodya knows that it is really dangerous because he knows that people can ruin their lives by acting to be someone they are not. Rodya also knows that people will isolate themselves from others just so that no one will find out their true personality. This is illustrated in through the fact that Luzhin tries to avoid Dunya and her mother as much as possible. The way he writes his letter, exemplifies his isolation, for Luzhin does not know how to interact with society. He has no idea how to write letters to his fiancée and his future mother in law. This reflects on Rodya’s second dream because he is unable to get Dunya married off to a nice person. He feels isolated from everyone else because his intellect caused him to sense that Luzhin is not telling the truth about his personality. However, it was due to his lack of moral purpose that Rodya berates his sister’s fiancé. He is unable to control himself, and due to his immoral act of getting drunk, Rodya loses all judgment and therefore goes and belittles Luzhin. Although Rodya’s intellectual mind had taken over and showed him that Luzhin was a fake, Rodya was unable to filter what he said, and due to this, he causes a rift between him and his family.

2. Rodya is a lot like Luzhin. He hopes to be a benefactor for Sonya, and wants to help her as much as he can. Since Rodya really cared about Marmeladov and his family, Rodya tries to help Marmeladov’s family a lot. This is shown by him giving money to Marmeldov twice, and now with Rodya’s attraction towards Sonya. This is a lot like Luzhin, because Luzhin wants to be Dunya’s benefactor. However, while Luzhin’s “love” for Dunya is a fake, Rodya’s attraction towards Sonya is heartfelt. He really cares about her and her family; hence Rodya wants to do whatever he can to make sure that Sonya and her family have enough money to support themselves. However, while Raskolnikov wants to be Sonya’s benefactor, he is also very much attracted to her. When she walks in, “he suddenly became embarrassed himself” (236). This illustrates the fact that Rodya really likes Sonya and is physically attracted to her. In the previous part, he describes her as if she were a beautiful doll, who is really fragile, and all he wants to do is protect her. This illustrates the fact that while he is really attracted to Sonya, he really...

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