Gatsby, Nick, Daisy In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

910 words - 4 pages

Jay Gatsby is the main character in The Great Gatsby. He is the mysterious character that the story revolves around. Nick is his neighbor that gets invited to Gatsby’s party that set in on Gatsby being a mysterious person that has so many people talking about him and talking about different stories about Gatsby that unravel how big of a mystery Gatsby is. In The Great Gatsby, “Gatsby’s notoriety, spread about by the hundreds who had accepted his hospitality and so become authorities on his past, had increased all summer until he fell just short of being news” (Fitzgerald 105). In chapter six, the real truth is revealed about the great Gatsby. The stories of the mysterious Gatsby in the parties were not true. The stories about Gatsby also went around New York, which made Nick ask Gatsby about his past. Nick also asked about Gatsby’s past hoping Nick would finally hear the truth. According to The Great Gatsby, “This was the night, Carraway says, that Gatsby told him the story (its factual details have been told earlier in the novel) of his early life. The purpose of the telling here is not to reveal facts but to try to understand the character of Gatsby’s passion. The final understanding is reserved for one of those precisely right utterances by which the characters reveal themselves so often in this novel: ‘In any case,’ Gatsby says, speaking of Daisy’s love for Tom, ‘it was just personal’”
("The Great Gatsby", Fitzgerald).
So finally, Nick hears the truth about Gatsby (Fitzgerald. Gatsby starts by telling Nick that his real name is James Gatz; he then went on about how he was born on a Dakota farm and his family was poor. He was a student at Olaf, but he quit two weeks later. He was paying for his collage by doing embarrassing custodial work. He was just flowing through life until he met the man who changed him.
Dan Cody the man who influenced Gatsby to act rich. Gatsby met Dan the next summer while Gatsby was fishing for clams when he spotted a man who owned a yacht rowed to his boat then told him that there was a storm coming. Dan took youthful Gatsby under his wing. As Gatsby started to work for Dan, he got a tasted of a lavish life style that he liked. Dan also had a drinking problem, so one of Gatsby jobs was to keep up with Dan when he got wasted. While it was Gatsby’s job to keep up with Dan, he realized the dangers of drinking and gave him heather prospective. Dan got sick and died. He left Gatsby $25,000 dollars, but the woman who Dan was having an affair with would not let Gatsby get it. Therefore, that led Gatsby on the track to be...

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