Gatsby, Nick, Tom, And Daisy In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

957 words - 4 pages

Nick Carraway is the most important person in the novel and plays a major role as well. Nick is the character that knows everything about everyone. He knows Gatsby more than anyone else does. He is said to be the reader’s access to Gatsby’s life. However, he is clueless as to the lies and rumors going around about Gatsby and some of the other things that are going on (Doreski). Nick tries to stay out of other people’s business but is always finding himself caught in the middle of it anyway (Hermanson).
Nick is not the perfect and innocent character in this book. He is a manipulator and excellent liar (“Great”, Scott). Nick thinks that he is above every characters wrongdoing. For example, he ...view middle of the document...

Nick understands Gatsby so well that he slightly stats to become Gatsby’s twin later on in the novel. The point in the book when this occurs is when Nick and Gatsby have their last meeting together. At the meeting Nick tells Gatsby, he is worth more than all the others. In addition, their educational and social backgrounds are similar. This may be the reason that Nick can understand Gatsby so well, unlike the others (Roulston and Roulston). Although Nick may be able to understand Gatsby so well, he is often confused. One moment he thinks Gatsby has something to hide and that Gatsby is fishy. At other times, Nick believes that Gatsby is the only honest person (Roulston and Roulston). Therefore, one could say that Nick often switches throughout the course of the novel and at times really does know what or who to believe.
Tom and Daisy Buchanan is the couple that Nick just cannot connect with in terms of having a friendship. Nick rejects the both of them. They have too much disorder going on in their lives for Nick. Tom and Daisy love stirring up a mess and then leaving the mess for others to clean up (Lisca). This is something that Nick finds troubling. However, Daisy’s opinion of Nick is the completely different from what he thinks of her. Daisy says, “I love to see you at my table, Nick. You remind me of a— of a rose, an absolute rose.” This lets the readers know that Daisy thinks highly of Nick. Nick is her long lost cousin and she likes him. He reminds her of rose, which I believe means that Tom is a sweet person (Fitzgerald 17). It is made clear in the book that Nick does not care for Tom at all. When Tom attempts to shake hands with Nick, Nick looks at Tom in a peculiar way. Tom notices that Nick does not want...

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