Geoffrey Chaucer And His "Canterbury Tales", A Collection Of Twenty Four Stories Told By Various People Who Are Going On A Religious Pilgrimage To Canterbury Cathedral From London, England

1640 words - 7 pages

Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is a collection of twenty-four stories told by various people who are going on a religious pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral from London, England (Kane 44). Prior to the actual tales, however, Chaucer offers the reader a glimpse of fourteenth century life by way of the General Prologue. In this prologue, Chaucer introduces all of the characters who are involved in this journey and who will tell the tales (Gardner 108). Among the characters included in this introductory section is the Knight, the Merchant, and the Pardoner.Chaucer begins with a knight. Chaucer's Knight was everything that a knight should be and usually was not -- honorable, courteous to all classes, brave in war and very conscientious about the religious significance of a pilgrimage. The knight had fine horses, but he was not lavishly dressed (Owens 62). He had on a shirt which was stained where is armor had left a mark. That is, the knight is just home from service and is in a hurry to go on his pilgrimage that he has not even paused before beginning it to change his clothes (Howard 90).The Knight is the perfect and courteous man who loved truth, freedom, chivalry, and honor. He is truly a distinguished man (Kane 22). He had ridden into battle in both Christian and heathen lands and in every instance served his king well. Even though he has had a very successful and busy career, he is extremely humble. The Knight never boasted his actions nor bored his listeners with his feats (Owens 63).Clearly, the Knight possesses an outstanding character. Chaucer gives to the knight one of the more flattering descriptions in the General Prologue. The Knight can do no wrong: he is an outstanding warrior who has fought for the true faith (Brewer 167). In the midst of all this he remains modest and polite. The Knight is the embodiment of the chivalric code: he is devout and courteous off the battlefield and is bold and fearless on it (Chute 189).The Knight is the most socially prominent person on the journey. He tells the first story and many pilgrims offer him compliments. The Knight tells a tale of ideal love and chivalry. This type of tale would have been very popular in Chaucer's day (Nicoll 21). The story fits the character of the Knight very well. It is filled with knights, love, honor, chivalry, and adventure. The love is an ideal love in which there is no hint of sensuality. The love exists on a high, platonic level (Kane 79). The emphasis in the story is upon rules of honor and proper conduct. The sense of honor is central to the story and the purity of love each of the knights in the story feels tends to glorify each character (Gardner 157).It is unlikely that people such as the Knight existed in the fourteenth century. As he does with all of his characters, Chaucer is creating a stereotype in creating the Knight (Williams 105). Chaucer, in describing the knight, is describing a chivalric ideal. Nevertheless, through the description, Chaucer shows...

Find Another Essay On Geoffrey Chaucer and his "Canterbury Tales", a collection of twenty-four stories told by various people who are going on a religious pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral from London, England

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

1235 words - 5 pages fourteenth century, but it was enduringly popular because of the story’s hilarious tales told from people of various classes that were both engaging and satirical of English society during his time (“Chaucer”). Chaucer almost definitely drew upon his own experiences to create such a varying cast of characters; some, like the knight, were possibly based on actual people Chaucer had met throughout his time in various jobs and traveling Europe

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

1544 words - 6 pages The Canterbury Tales is a set of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the fourteenth century. The stories were told by a group of pilgrims traveling to Canterbury Cathedral, in hopes to see a shrine of Saint Thomas Becket. To make time go by the host recommended each pilgrim tell a tale. The tale that each character gives, reveals that person’s background and life. Some pilgrims matched their stereotype of that time but most do not. The

The Canterbury Tales - by Geoffrey Chaucer

3158 words - 13 pages The Canterbury Tales, written by Geoffrey Chaucer, is a collection of tales that branch from a main story line. Each tale was written by fictional characters of different rank and status in English medieval society. These tales offer excellent insights into various aspects of medieval society and culture, and the evolution of this society to our current one.The Canterbury Tales begins at the Tabard Inn, near London. The narrator joins a group of

Power and Corruption in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

2205 words - 9 pages pilgrimage to Canterbury. Sadly he died before it was completed. The Canterbury Tales was supposed to be a work of one hundred and twenty stories; each pilgrim would tell two stories on the way to and from Canterbury to entertain everyone as they traveled. Though the bigger piece was not finished, he did write the ending of the book. It ends with the Parson’s tale, and a retraction. Thus it leaves room for his retraction to be interpreted. It is The

Analysis of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

878 words - 4 pages The Canterbury Tales is more than an amusing assortment of stories; it is an illustration of the society in which Geoffrey Chaucer lived. It portrays the culture and class system of the medieval ages in microcosm. Every strata of human life at the time were represented by the many characters whose tales are told. Each character’s basic human nature also plays a role in their stories, and each one has within them the strengths and weaknesses

This is a paper on the basic life of Geoffrey Chaucer, and the fundamental concepts of his composition "The Canterbury Tales"

575 words - 2 pages the entire Canterbury Tales as he designed it. His original intention was to structure the tales so that each pilgrim would tell four, which would add up to a total of over one hundred tales. However, Chaucer only completed twenty-four tales, which is not even one tale for each pilgrim.. Chaucer's collection of stories combine different genres of literature with imaginative style and creative ideas to conjoin literary perfection with entertainment value. Despite the incompleteness of the book, The Canterbury Tales united to hold strong for centuries, and still prevail as one of the most significant pieces of literature from the Middle Ages.

Character Anlysis of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

945 words - 4 pages reader to determine whether a character is convincing or questionable. Based on Chaucer’s analysis of each character, the most ideal characters in, The Canterbury Tales are the Knight from the ruling class, the Oxford Cleric from the middle class, and the Plowman from the peasant class; however, each social group also has a character who falls short of the ideal as established by the model character in each group for example, the squire in the ruling

The Unholy church. Who and how does Geoffrey Chaucer satirize in the Canterbury Tales and what is his opinion on the Church?

870 words - 3 pages Religion in England during the fourteenth century was a dominant part of society and people's lives. Through The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, people can try to comprehend what the people of England were like and how they lived their daily lives. Now is where the corruption and foul people of the church come in to play in The Canterbury Tales there are many religious characters: Monk, Friar, Pardoner, Nun, Prioress - the list continues

Chaucer: an analysis of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales"

1260 words - 5 pages When we are taken on the pilgrimage to Canterbury by Chaucer in the story “The Canterbury Tales” we are introduced to all classes of characters from every corner of life. The use of satire is used throughout the story and I believe it helps, it shows the stereotypical difference in class at his time of day. While keeping nothing from harm in “The Canterbury Tales” Chaucer takes a huge chance by mocking even the church. But did all the use of

Reader Response to "Canterbury Tales" by Chaucer

688 words - 3 pages In his prologue, Geoffrey Chaucer introduces all of the characters who are involved in this fictional journey and who will tell the tales. One of the more interesting of the characters included in this introductory section is the Knight. Chaucer initially refers to the Knight as 'a most distinguished man' and, indeed, his sketch of the Knight is highly complimentary. In this essay, I will contrast Chaucer's ideal Knight with its modern

Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

1287 words - 5 pages Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales The Knight, Squire, Prioress, The Monk and the Friar are defined by their settings in Geoffrey Chaucer’s "Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales. 1. Portnoy says in his article in the Chaucer Review that "The General Prologue is like a mirror reflecting the individuals appearance which then defines the character of that person."(281) 2. Scanlon backs up Portnoy in his article from Speculum by saying

Similar Essays

Canterbury Tales By Geoffrey Chaucer Essay

1275 words - 5 pages deriding vice, folly, etc.” and is often used to disguise a real message. One shining example of satire in literature is Geoffrey Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales the General Prologue, The Pardoner’s Prologue and Tale, and The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale. Chaucer uses his satire to call attention to the issues he sees in their society and the audience he chiefly addresses are those who are being fooled by their firm belief in the church and

"Canterbury Tales" By Geoffrey Chaucer Essay

1721 words - 7 pages who comes "from the kindred of so high a kind," (Chaucer 409) is faced with a serious decision between love and honor, which is bestowed on her by Aurelius. Arvéragus, a noble knight who is married to Dorigen, is also impacted and has to guide Dorigen. Aurelius "burned with love," (Chaucer 415) for Dorigen but was reluctant to tell her at first because it is against courtly love. He gets so desperate that he eventually lets it slip and

"Canterbury Tales" By Geoffrey Chaucer Essay

723 words - 3 pages Canterbury Tales EssayIt is said that everyone has a twin or a double in thisworld or someone who is the same as another in looks, ideas,beliefs, or characteristics. By the same token- if this is true-does everyone also have an opposite in this world or someone whois opposite in these qualities? It seems as though the Wife ofBath from The Canterbury Tales proves the latter situation to betrue. Her opposite would be Tess D'Urberville from Tess of

The Canterbury Tales, By Geoffrey Chaucer

1557 words - 6 pages The Canterbury Tales is more than an amusing assortment of stories; it is an illustration of the society in which Geoffrey Chaucer lived. It portrays the culture and class system of the medieval ages in microcosm. Every strata of human life at the time were represented by the many characters whose tales are told. Each character’s basic human nature also plays a role in their stories, and each one has within them the strengths and weaknesses that