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George Orwell's Style Of Writing Essay

1106 words - 4 pages

Just by a simple glance at George Orwell's style of writing one can grasp a lot. He first starts the essay by discussing how the narrator was poorly treated in Lower Burma when serving as a police officer. More specifically the narrator states, "I was hated by large numbers of people,", and "anti-European feeling was very bitter." From there one could interpret that although he was a British soldier with much power he was "baited whenever it seemed safe to do so." He then goes into much detail and paints scenes into the reader's mind such as how a European woman could not cross the market without having someone "spit betel juice over her dress," to create a sense of remorse for the roughly treated Europeans. Furthermore, Orwell creates detailed imagery throughout his text to show how poorly Europeans were treated in Burma. He uses connotation words in the scenes he creates to display a certain feeling. For an example, in football scene where someone trips he uses the word "hideous laughter" to display the audience's support of bad treatment to the Europeans and their cruelty. Soon after succeeding in gaining the reader's sympathy by expressing the narrator's feelings as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, Orwell shifts his focus on criticizing imperialism.
In his second paragraph, the narrator overtly utters his criticism towards imperialism when he says "I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing... I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British."At this point, the reader can interpret that the narrator has sympathy for the Burmese; however, is put in a circumstance that he has no choice but to obey the oppressor, the British due to his position. This is where the reader can relate the theme of imperialism Orwell uses; since, he is also trying to prove that even in the such a high position the narrator is also affected by imperialism and has no choice to be in support of the Burmese although he wishes too. The narrator then elaborates on his struggle of not making his hatred towards his job obvious; and says "I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear." He even claims that it consisted of "the dirty work of Empire at close quarters." Furthermore, the narrator claims that seeing the convicts and prisoners "oppressed" him with suffering guilt; which in my opinion makes the reader sympathize for him being part of the British establishment; which restricts him from following his sympathy towards the Burmese.
Orwell's broad style of writing sways the reader into feeling how oppressed the narrator was to be part of the British establishment in Burma. Moreover, one could sense the narrator's guilt of being part of the establishment and on the other hand, how he is forced to stay serene about which clearly symbolizes his lack of freedom. Orwell's concise style of writing makes it clear that there was no freedom for the British in Burma whether they held a high position or no position at all.
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